vrijdag 21 augustus 2015

Lonesome Road Blues (1924) / Worried Blues (1924) / Goin' Down The Road Feelin' Bad (1924) / Blowin' Down This Road (1940) / Chilly Winds (1957)


Going Down The Road Feelin' Bad, also known as the Lonesome Road Blues, is an American traditional song, "a white blues of universal appeal and uncertain origin" (Ralph Rinzler, quoted on Erbsen 2003, p. 118).
It was recorded by many artists through the years; the first known is Henry Whitter in 1924 as "Lonesome Road Blues". Others who made cover versions include Samantha Bumgarner (as "Worried Blues"), Cliff Carlisle (as "Down In The Jail On My Knees"), Woody Guthrie (also as "Blowin' Down This Road" or "I Ain't Gonna Be Treated This Way"), Bill Monroe, Earl Scruggs, Roy Hall, Elizabeth Cotten and the Grateful Dead.

http://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/LxU072.html

http://www.bluegrassmessengers.com/lonesome-road-blues-henry-whitter.aspx

http://tunearch.org/wiki/Annotation:Going_Down_the_Road_Feeling_Bad

http://www.originals.be/en/originals.php?id=9213


The song turns up on page 242 of the 1947 book Folk Song U.S.A. by John A. Lomax and Alan Lomax, edited by son Alan. It is in the key of D and the tempo is described as "moderately fast." Here are all the verses from that version: Goin' Down the Road Feelin' Bad

I'm goin' down this road feelin' bad,
Lord, I'm goin' down this road feelin' bad,
Well, I'm goin' down this road feelin' bad, Lord, Lord,
An' I ain't gonna be treated thisaway.

I ain't got but one old lousy dime,
Lord, I ain't got but one old lousy dime,
Well, I ain't got but one old lousy dime, Lord, Lord,
But I'll find me a new dollar some old day.

A two dollar shoe won't fit my feet,
Lord, a two dollar shoe won't fit my feet,
Well, a two dollar shoe won't fit my feet, Lord, Lord,
'Cause I ain't gonna be treated thisaway.

Takes a ten dollar shoe to fit my feet,
Lord, takes a ten dollar shoe to fit my feet,
Well, takes a ten dollar shoe to fit my feet, Lord, Lord,
'Cause I ain't gonna be treated thisaway.

I'm goin' where the climate suits my clothes,
Lord, I'm goin' where the climate suits my clothes,
Well, I'm goin' where the climate suits my clothes, Lord, Lord,
'Cause I ain't gonna be treated thisaway.

I'm goin' where the water tastes like wine,
Lord, I'm goin' where the water tastes like wine,
Well, I'm goin' where the water tastes like wine, Lord, Lord,
'Cause this water round here tastes like turpentine.

I'm tired of lyin' in this jail,
Lord, I'm tired of lyin' in this jail,
Well, I'm tired of lyin' in this jail, Lord, Lord,
An' I ain't gonna be treated thisaway.

Yes, they feed me on cornbread and beans,
Lord, they feed me on cornbread and beans,
Well, they feed me on cornbread and beans, Lord, Lord,
And I ain't gonna be treated thisaway

Who'll stir your gravy when I'm gone?
Lord, who'll stir your gravy when I'm gone?
Well, who'll stir your gravy when I'm gone? Lord, Lord,
When I'm gone to my long, lonesome home

Also included in the Frank C Brown Collection vol 5 (song # 441 on page 297)

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First recorded by Henry Whitter on December 10, 1923
Released on Okeh 40015.

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Lyrics

Oh I’m goin’ down this road feelin’ bad
Oh I’m goin’ down this road feelin’ bad
Oh I’m goin’ down this road feelin’ bad
And I ain’t gonna be treated this a-way

Oh I’m goin’ where the chilly wind never blows
Oh I’m goin’ where the chilly wind never blows
Oh I’m goin’ where the chilly wind never blows
And I ain’t gonna be treated this a-way.

Oh (I’m) way down in jail on my knees,
Oh way down in jail on my knees,
Oh way down in jail on my knees,
And I ain’t gonna be treated this a-way.

Oh they feed me on cornbread and peas
Oh, they feed me on cornbread and peas
Oh, they feed me on cornbread and peas
I ain’t gonna be treated this a-way.

Yes, I’m goin’ where the climate suits my clothes,
Oh I’m goin’ where the climate suits my clothes,
Oh I’m goin’ where the climate suits my clothes,
I ain’t gonna be treated this a-way

Yes I’m goin’ if I never come back,
Oh I’m goin’ if I never come back,
Oh I’m goin’ if I never come back,
And I ain’t gonna be treated this a-way.

Listen here:






 (c) James Barton (1924)  (as "I'm Going Where The Climate Fits My Clothes")
Recorded May 1, 1924 in New York
Released on Okeh 40136.

http://honkingduck.com/discography/artist/james_barton



(c) Henry Whitter (1924)  ( as "Goin' Down The Road Feelin' Bad")
On July 16, 1924 Henry Whitter was also the first one to record the song with the more familiar title "Goin' Down The Road Feelin' Bad"
Released on the Okeh-label (#40169)

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Lyrics

Oh I’m goin’ down this road I'm feelin’ bad
Oh I’m goin’ down this road I'm feelin’ bad
Oh I’m goin’ down this road I'm feelin’ bad
And I ain’t gonna be treated this a-way

Oh it's one dollar won't buy me no shoes
Oh it's one dollar won't buy me no shoes
Oh it's one dollar won't buy me no shoes
And I ain’t gonna be treated this a-way

Oh a two dollar shoe hurt my feet
Oh a two dollar shoe hurt my feet
Oh a two dollar shoe hurt my feet
And I ain’t gonna be treated this a-way

Yes some five dollar shoe fits on me
Your five dollar shoe fits on me
Oh a five dollar shoe fits on me
And I ain’t gonna be treated this a-way

Oh and snap out your finger get your load
Oh and snap out your finger get your load
Oh and snap out your finger get your load
And I ain’t gonna be treated this a-way

 ( I couldn't figure out the sixth verse. Anyone ?)


Oh I’m goin’ down this road I'm feelin’ bad
Oh I’m goin’ down this road I'm feelin’ bad
Oh I’m goin’ down this road I'm feelin’ bad
And I ain’t gonna be treated this a-way

 ( I couldn't figure out the eigth verse either. Anyone ?)


Oh it's mama said i can't live with you
Oh it's mama said i can't live with you
Oh it's mama said i can't live with you
And I think by myself for the way you do

Listen here:






"Worried Blues" is a song that is very closely connected to "Lonesome Road Blues" / "Going Down The Road Feeling Bad".

http://www.originals.be/en/originals.php?id=7072

Samantha Bumgarner was the first one to record the variation with this title:

(o) Samantha Bumgarner (1924) (as "Worried Blues")

Recorded April 23, 1924 in New York, NY;
Samantha Bumgarner, voc, bj
Released on Columbia 166-D

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http://www.discogs.com/Samantha-Bumgarner-The-Worried-Blues-Georgia-Blues/release/7180983

http://adp.library.ucsb.edu/index.php/matrix/detail/2000029484/81718-The_worried_blues

http://www.wirz.de/music/bumgafrm.htm

Lyrics:

Got the worried blues (x3)
Can't be worried this a-way.

See you when your troubles are like mine (x3)
See you when you can't change a dime

Got the worried blues (x3)
Can't be worried this a-way

Bound down in the jail (x3)
No one to go my bail 

Honey babe would you [or "won't you"] go my bail (x3)
Can't be worried this a-way 

Goin' down this long lonesome road (x3)
Can't be worried this a-way 

Honey babe, don't leave me here (x3)
Unless you leave a dime for beer

Got the worried blues (x3)
Can't be worried this a-way

Goin' down this long lonesome road (x3)
Can't be worried this a-way

Goin' down this long lonesome road (x3)
Can't be worried this a-way

Listen here:





(c) Hill Billies 1926 (as "Goin Down The Road Feeling Bad")
Tony Alderman, f; Fred Roe, f; Charles Bowman, bj; Al Hopkins, p/v; Joe Hopkins, g/v; Henry Roe, g; John Hopkins, u/v.
Recorded on October 23, 1926 in New York, NY
Released on Vocalion 5021

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Lyrics

Goin' down this road feelin' bad,
Oh, goin' down this road feelin' bad,
Oh, goin' down this road feelin' bad, Lord, Lord,
And I ain't gonna be treated this-away

Way down in jail on my knees,
Oh way down in jail on my knees,
Oh way down in jail on my knees, Lord. Lord
And I ain’t gonna be treated this a-way.

Feed me on cornbread and peas
Oh, they feed me on cornbread and peas
Oh, they feed me on cornbread and peas, Lord. Lord
I ain’t gonna be treated this a-way

Mama won't find me no cure ?
Mama won't find me no cure ?
Mama won't find me no cure ? Lord, Lord
And I ain't gonna be treated this-away.

Goin' down this road feelin' bad,
Oh, goin' down this road feelin' bad,
Oh, goin' down this road feelin' bad, Lord, Lord,
And I ain't gonna be treated this-away.

Listen here:





(c) Frank Hutchison (1927)  (as "Worried Blues") the familiar melody, with his own lyrics.

Lyrics are on the next site http://weeniecampbell.com/yabbse/index.php?topic=4210.30

Hutchison recorded the song twice:
once on September 28, 1926, at his first recording session, released on Okeh 45064

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Listen here:



and again on April 29, 1927, released on Okeh 45114

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Listen here:




(c) Riley Puckett (1927)  (as "I'm Going Where The Chilly Winds Don't Blow")
Riley Puckett (solo vcl/gt)
Recorded October, 31 1927 in Atlanta, GA
Released on Columbia 15392-D




(c) Fiddlin John Carson (1929)  (as "You Can't Get Milk From A Cow Named Ben")

Last instrumental part of the song

Released on Okeh 45321

http://www.discogs.com/Fiddlin-John-Carson-And-Moonshine-Kate-You-Cant-Get-Milk-From-A-Cow-Named-Ben-Going-To-The-County-Fa/release/7266310

Listen here:




(c) Fiddlin John Carson and Moonshine Kate (1929)  (as "Down South Where The Sugar Cane Grows")

http://www.discogs.com/Fiddlin-John-Carson-Moonshine-Kate-Hawk-And-Buzzard-Down-South-Where-The-Sugar-Cane-Grows/release/7266437

Released on Okeh 45338

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Lyrics:

Going where the Sugar cane grows
Going where the Sugar cane grows
Going where the Sugar cane grows, Lord, Lord
And I ain't got no trouble at my knees.

Going where the climate suits my clothes
Going where the climate suits my clothes
Going where the climate suits my clothes, Lord, Lord
And I ain't got no trouble at my knees.

Etc, Etc



Listen here:




Fiddlin John Carson with his Virginia Reelers also recorded this song as an instrumental

(c) Fiddlin'  John Carson & His Virginia Reelers (1930)  (as " Goin' Where The Climate Suits My Clothes")
Recorded April 24, 1930
Released on Okeh 45498

Listen here:





In 1931 Sam Collins recorded a song called "Lonesome Road Blues (I'm Goin' Down That Lonesome Road)". This is another song.



(c) Cliff Carlisle 1933 (as "Goin' Down The Road Feelin' Bad")
Recorded July 28, 1933 in New York
Released on various labels such as Conqueror, Panachord and Oriole

http://www.discogs.com/Cliff-Carlisle-Dang-My-Rowdy-Soul-Goin-Down-The-Road-Feelin-Bad/release/7252937

http://www.discogs.com/Cliff-Carlisle-Goin-Down-The-Road-Feelin-Bad-Dang-My-Rowdy-Soul/release/7251358

Listen here:





(c) Riley Puckett 1934 (as "K. C. Railroad")
Recorded March 30, 1934 in San Antonio, Texas
Released on Bluebird 5471 and Montgomery Ward 4508

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http://www.openmusicarchive.org/projects/index.php?title=Parallel_Anthology_Track_81

http://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/ADR102.html

Listen here:





Additionally, the song "Goin' Down The Road Feelin' Bad" is sung by Eddie Quillan, in his character of Conny Rivers, in a nighttime scene at a labor campin the movie "Grapes Of Wrath"  (1940).

SEE THE SCENE HERE (at 42 min and 57 seconds in the next YT)





(c) Woody Guthrie (1940) (as "Goin’ Down The Road Feelin’ Bad")
Woody Guthrie, vocal and guitar.
Recorded by Alan Lomax at the Department of the Interior radio facility in Washington, D.C., on March 22, 1940.

Woody Guthrie introduced the song this way:


WG: Well, one of the most popular, uh, Alan, was the one that they chose for the Grapes of Wrath picture. “I’m Going Down that Road Feelin’ Bad.” That’s got two or three names. A lot of people call it the “Lonesome Road Blues.” Others call it “Goin’ Down the Road Feelin’ Bad.” It’s got all kinds of names. Anyway, in the picture, they, they sing it pretty classical. I don’t know whether the Okies and the hobos will recognize it or not but then I’m not worried about that because I don’t think that they’ll be spendin’ a quarter to get to see a bunch of grapes or stuff…I don’t know whatever the devil that means, “grapes of wrath.” Here’s the ole song. 
It was wrote, uh, by, uh, a colored slave that run off from his master and went back up North.
He was a Southern slave and he run up North and it was pretty cold up there. So, uh, he worked ‘round up there a little bit and stayed in jails and everythin’ and was treated like a dog, and so awful cold up North and so he wrote this song or got it started:

Listen here:




(c) Woody Guthrie (1940)
In 1940 Woody recorded his own adaptation of the song for the RCA Victor label.
RCA asked Woody to record 12 Dust Bowl Ballads to respond to the enormous success of the Grapes Of Wrath book and film.
Using only guitar and vocals, the album follows the exodus of Midwesterners headed for California and mirrors both Guthrie’s own life and John Steinbeck’s novel The Grapes of Wrath.

Woody Guthrie, v; acc. own h/g.
Recorded in New York, NY on April 26, 1940
Released on Victor 26619

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Also released as part of the Dust Bowl Ballads-album

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dust_Bowl_Ballads

Lyrics are here: http://woodyguthrie.org/Lyrics/Going_Down_The_Road.htm

Listen here:






(c) Almanac Singers (1942)  (as "Goin' Down the Road Feelin' Bad")
Woody Guthrie: harmonica and vocals / Pete Seeger: banjo
January 1942 "Home Disc Recordings" made by the Almanac Singers in New York
Accessioned by the Library Of Congress in February 1942 on glass-base records
Tape copy on LWO 3493 / reel 41A /  Matrix 6105A

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http://www.loc.gov/item/afc9999005.18229



(c) Weavers (1957)  (as "Goin' Down the Road Feelin' Bad")
Unissued version by the Weavers from the Pete Seeger era.
Finally released in 2003 on the Vanguard album "Rarities From The Vanguard Vault"

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/812ThLXqMZL._SL1086_.jpg

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/81f7%2Bm-D6iL._SL1261_.jpg

Listen here:





(c) Hally Wood (1956)  (as "Worried Blues")
Released on her album "Hally Wood Sings Texas Folk Songs" (Stinson SLP 73)
On the liner-notes of her album, credits go to Samantha Bumgarner (see her 1924 version earlier on in this post)

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Listen here:

https://soundcloud.com/ashes-3/hally-wood-worried-blues



(c) Odetta (1957)  (as "Chilly Winds")

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/At_the_Gate_of_Horn

http://www.discogs.com/Odetta-At-The-Gate-Of-Horn/release/5093814

Listen here:





(c) Elizabeth Cotten (1958) (as "Going Down the Road Feeling Bad")
On the album "Negro Folk Songs and Tunes" (Folkways FG 3526)

http://www.geocities.co.jp/Hollywood/1061/cotten_disco.html#1

Lyrics are here: http://www.geocities.co.jp/Hollywood/1061/lyrics_gdrfb.html

Listen here:





(c) Nina Simone (1959) (as "Chilly Winds Don't Blow")

http://www.boscarol.com/ninasimone/pages/php/show_album.php?id=cp116

Listen here:





(c) Cisco Houston (1960) (as "Chilly Winds")

http://ciscohouston.com/lyrics/chilly_winds.shtml

On the album "Cisco Special" (Vanguard: VRS 9057)

http://ciscohouston.com/LPs/cisco_special.shtml

Listen here:






(c) Jack Burchett (1961)  (as "Chilly winds")
Jack Burchett (vocal and banjo)
Recorded July 1961 in Saltville, Virginia.

Released on the next album:

http://www.folkways.si.edu/doc-watson-and-clarence-ashley/chilly-winds-lonesome-road-blues/american-folk-old-time/music/track/smithsonian

Listen here:






(c) Bob Dylan (1962) (as "Worried Blues")
Recorded Jul 9, 1962 during the Freewheelin' sessions
Released on The Bootleg Series 1-3 (1991)

According to the next site Bob had learned it from Hally Wood, who had learned it from Samantha Bumgarner (according to the liner-notes on her album "Hally Wood Sings Texas Folk Songs" (Stinson SLP 73)

http://www.searchingforagem.com/2010s/2012.htm

http://www.bobdylan.com/us/songs/worried-blues

http://www.interferenza.com/bcs/freew_2.htm

Lyrics

I got those worried blues,
And I got those worried blues,
I got those worried blues,
I got those worried blues,
Lord, I'm a-going where I never been before.

I'm going where the chilly winds don't blow,
I'm going where the chilly winds don't blow,
I'm going where the chilly winds don't blow,
I'm going where the chilly winds don't blow,
I'm going where the climate suits my clothes.

Honey babe don't leave me now,
Honey babe don't leave me now,
Oh honey babe don't leave me now,
Honey babe don't leave me now.
I got trouble in my mind.

Listen to that cold whistle blow,
Lord listen to that cold whistle blow,
Listen to that cold whistle blow,
Listen to that cold whistle blow,
I'm going where I'm never been before.

So I got those worries blues, lord,
I got the worried blues,
I got the worried blues,
And I got the worried blues.
I'm a-going where I never been before.

Listen here:






It is also one of the Dylan/Band Basement Tapes songs - (as "Going Down the Road Feeling Bad" or "No Shoes On My Feet")..

http://iml.jou.ufl.edu/projects/spring01/blake/basement.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Basement_Tapes_songs

Listen here:

http://iml.jou.ufl.edu/projects/spring01/blake/Bob%20Dylan%20-%20Genuine%20Basement%20Tapes%20Vol.5%20-%2012%20-%20No%20Shoes.MP3



The song was part of a medley on the 1970 Delaney & Bonnie album "To Bonnie From Delaney"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/To_Bonnie_from_Delaney




The track also appears on the 1971 Delaney & Bonnie album Motel Shot 





This song became a concert staple for the Grateful Dead, and Jerry Garcia related that he picked it up from Delaney Bramlett of Delaney and Bonnie during the Dead’s trans-Canada rock ‘n’ roll train trip in 1970, beautifully captured in the "Festival Express" movie.

http://www.discogs.com/Various-Festival-Express-/release/7134789

http://theband.hiof.no/films/festival_express.html

 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Festival_Express

Garcia and Bramlett can be seen jamming on the tune, with Janis Joplin singing along with Bramlett, in the movie Festival Express (click on the blue link and the song opens on the Web-site).



Subsequently the song appeared on Grateful Dead’s so-called “Skull & Roses” album, ( the 1971 live double LP "Grateful Dead".)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grateful_Dead_(album)

http://www.whitegum.com/introjs.htm?/songfile/GOINGDOW.HTM

http://www.deaddisc.com/songs/Goin_Down_The_Road_Feeling_Bad.htm

http://taco.com/roots/songs_part2.html

Listen here:



Grateful Dead's version may also be influenced by Woody Guthrie, as well as other renditions by Bill Monroe (1960), Elizabeth Cotton (1958), and Cliff Carlisle (1933).



(c) Bruce Springsteen (as "Blowin' Down The Road")

In 1993 and 1996 Bruce Sprigsteen sang the Woody Guthrie-adaptation of the song on a few gigs

http://www.brucespringsteen.it/DB/sd3.aspx?sid=70

Listen here:




(c) U2 (2011)   (as "Worried Blues")

And in May 2011 U2 sang it on a few gigs.

http://bootlegpedia.com/en/song/Worried_Blues



(c) John Mayer (2013)  (as "Going Down The Road Feeling Bad")

And in 2013 John Mayer sang it live in the David Letterman Show. His version was inspired by the version of the Grateful Dead.
Plans even are John Mayer might join the remaining Dead members on a Halloween-show at New York's Madison Square Garden. For the occasion the bandname will be dubbed Dead & Company.

http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/grateful-dead-members-john-mayer-form-dead-company-20150805





The tune was also used in other traditional songs:

-"New River Train" also recorded by Henry Whitter in 1924

http://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/AF073.html

http://secondhandsongs.com/work/126037

-"I Wish I Was A Mole In The Ground" first recorded by Bascom Lamar Lunsford in 1924

http://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/BAF900.html



-"Roll On Buddy" recorded by Charlie Bowman 1928 (besides the tune there are floating lyrics from "I Wish I Was A Mole In The Ground")

http://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/RcROBRO2.html



-"My Last Gold Dollar" - Bascom Lamar Lunsford (who had learned it from Samantha Bumgarner and Moonshine Kate)

http://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/R671.html



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