zondag 27 juli 2014

Land Of Beulah (1862) / O Bear Me Away On Your Snowy Wings (1927) / My Latest Sun Is Sinking Fast (1928) / Angel Band (1954)



It is an American Gospel music song. The tune was written by William Batchelder Bradbury (1816-1868) to a lyric of Jefferson Hascall (1807-1887).            

Lyrics first written to a tune written by J.W. Dadmun. This was first published in the tunebook The Melodeon (1860) as "Angels Bear Me Away".

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https://archive.org/stream/imslp-new-melodeon-various/PMLP314603-Dadmun_new_melodeon_1869_nla.mus-vn288861-p#page/n133/mode/2up

The tune by Bradbury was published in Bradbury's Golden Shower of S.S. Melodies in 1862. Bradbury's song was originally titled "The Land of Beulah".

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https://archive.org/stream/bradburysgoldens00brad#page/50/mode/2up

The song became more commonly known under the title: "Angel Band".

http://www.originals.be/en/originals.php?id=12400


First recording I could find:

(o) Dixie Sacred Singers (1927)  (as "O Bear Me Away On Your Snowy Wings")
Recorded in New York: May 10, 1927.
Released on Vocalion B 5160.

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Over a four day period in 1927, Uncle Dave Macon recorded a total of 38 sides in New York City for the Vocalion Record Company. There were eight solo tracks (banjo and voice), two tracks with Sam and Kirk McGee and a further twenty-eight tracks by Uncle Dave, the McGee Brothers and fiddler, Mazy Todd. Eighteen of these tracks were issued as by “Uncle Dave Macon & His Fruit Jar Drinkers”, the rest as by the “Dixie Sacred Singers”, or else as “Uncle Dave Macon & McGee Brothers”, when Mazy Todd was not playing.
The Dixie Sacred Singers were:
Uncle Dave Macon: banjo, vocal
Sam McGee: guitar, vocal
Kirk McGee: mandolin, vocal
Mazy Todd: fiddle

Listen here:






(c) Smith's Sacred Singers (1928)  (as "My Latest Sun Is Sinking Fast")
Smith’s Sacred Singers: prob.: J. Frank Smith, lv; Joe Day, tv; Willie Fowler, bv; Will Brewer, bsv; acc. poss. Mildred Cowsert, p.
Recorded in Atlanta, GA on April 17, 1928.
Released on Columbia 15281-D

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Listen here:





(c) Dye's Sacred Harp Singers (1928)  (as "Land Of Beulah")
Recorded in Richmond, IN on December 15, 1928
Released on Gennett 6736

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Listen here:




(c) Fiddlin' John Carson & Moonshine Kate (1934)  (as "Bear Me Away On Your Snowy White Wings")
Recorded in Camden, NJ on February 27, 1934
Fiddlin’ John Carson, v/ f; Bill Willard, bj; Moonshine Kate, g/v; Marion “Peanut” Brown, g/v.
Released on Bluebird BB B-5560 and Montgomery Ward M-4851

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Listen here:




(c) Carl Butler (1954)  (as "Angel Band")
Recorded October 27, 1954 in the Castle Studio At The Tulane Hotel, Nashville 3, TN
Carl Butler, &Webster Brothers (Jack Shook, Don Helms, Ernie Newton, Dale Potter, Marvin Hughes)
Released on Columbia  4-21353
This version (the first one to use the familiar title "Angel Band") was written/ arranged by Carl Butler's wife Pearl Butler (born Pearl D. Jones)

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http://www.45cat.com/record/421353s

Listen here:





(c) Stanley Brothers (1958) (as "Angel Band")
Stanley Brothers & Clinch Mountain Boys (Carter Stanley [vcl/gt], Ralph Stanley [vcl/banjo], Curley Lambert [vcl/mandolin], Bill Lowe [vcl/bass], Art Stamper [vcl/fiddle].)
Recorded December 19, 1955 Bradley Studios, 804 16th Ave. South, Nashville 3, TN -
Released in 1958 on the album:  Mercury MG 20349

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http://www.ibiblio.org/hillwilliam/BGdiscography/?v=fullrecord&albumid=44





(c) Carter Family (1956)  (as "Angel Band")
Recorded on April 19, 1956 during the so-called ACME sessions in Bristol, TN
Released in 2008 on The ACME Sessions.

http://www.allmusic.com/album/the-acme-sessions-1952-56-mw0000496549

Listen here:





(c) Wilburn Brothers (1959)  (as "O Come Angel Band")
Wilburn Brothers (Doyle Wilburn [vcl], Teddy Wilburn [vcl], Grady Martin [gt], Sammy Pruett [gt], Don Helms [steel], Roy M. "Junior" Huskey, Jr. [bass], Floyd Cramer [piano], Tommy Jackson [fiddle].)
Recorded September 14, 1959 Bradley Film & Recording Studio, Nashville, TN -
Released on album "Livin' in God's Country" (Decca DL-78959)

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Here's the Wilburn Brothers from their own show:




(c) The Browns (1961)  (as "My Latest Sun Is Sinking Fast")
Browns (Jim Ed Brown, Maxine Brown, Bonnie Brown + Hank Garland [gt], Velma Smith [gt], Henry Strzelecki [bass], Farris Coursey [drums], Floyd Cramer [piano], Grady Martin [vibes], Anita Kerr [organ]. Producer: Chet Atkins)
Recorded July 28, 1961, RCA Victor Studio, 1610 Hawkins St., Nashville 3, TN
Released on the album:  "Sing Songs From The Little Brown Church Hymnal" (RCA Victor LSP 2345)

http://www.lpdiscography.com/?page=song&song=4221





(c) Porter Wagoner (1963)  (as "Angel Band")
Recorded February 1963 RCA Victor Studio, 1611 Hawkins St., Nashville, TN
Released on the album "Y'all Come" (RCA Victor LSP-2706)

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(c) Bill Anderson (1967)
Recorded February 24,  1967 Columbia Recording Studio, 804 16th Ave. South, Nashville, TN -
Bill Anderson (Bill Anderson [vcl], Harold Bradley [gt], Jerry Shook [gt], Jimmy Lance [gt], Sonny Garrish [steel], Roy M. "Junior" Huskey, Jr. [bass], Leonard Miller [drums], Jerry Smith [piano] + The Jordanaires.)
Released on the album "I Can Do Nothing Alone"  (Decca DL 74886)

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Listen here:

http://grooveshark.com/s/Angel+Band/3K2lkC?src=5



(c) Monkees (1969)  (as "Angel Band")

On the album "Missing Links Vol 3".

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Missing_Links_Volume_Three

Listen here:




(c) Charley Pride (1971)  (as "Angel Band")
Recorded February 10, 1971 RCA Victor Studio, 800 17th Ave. South, Nashville, TN –
Charley Pride (Charley Pride [vcl] + unknown musicians. Producer: Jack Clement)
Released on the album "Did You Think To Pray" (RCA Victor LSP-4513)

http://www.discogs.com/Charley-Pride-Did-You-Think-To-Pray/release/1675942

Listen here:





(c) Old And In The Way (1973)
"Angel Band" was performed by Old And In The Way on October 1, 1973.
And finally released in 1996:

http://www.dead101.com/1274.htm

http://www.deaddisc.com/songs/Angel_Band.htm

http://www.dead101.com/10654.htm

http://www.whitegum.com/~acsa/introjs.htm?/~acsa/songfile/ANGELBAN.HTM

Listen here:





(c) Johnny Cash (1979)  (as "Oh Come, Angel Band")
Johnny Cash (Johnny Cash [vcl/gt], Jack Routh [gt], Jack Clement [rh gt], Bob Wooton [el gt], Marshall Grant [el bass], Jerry Hensley [gt], WS Holland [drums], Earl Ball [piano], Jack Hale [trumpet], Robert Lewin [trumpet], Carter Family [bck vcl]. Producer: Johnny Cash)
Recorded January 24, 1979 Columbia Recording Studio, 34 Music Sq. East, Nashville, TN
Overdub sessions:
25 January 1979; 
5 March 1979 Jerry Hensley [gt], Mike Leech [bass], strings, Wayne Jackson [trumpet], Earl Poole Ball [piano], Mark Morris [percussion], Carter Family;
14 May 1979 Jerry Hensley [gt], Joel Sonnier [concertina], Earl poole Ball [piano],
18 May 1979 William Puett [flute/sax/oboe], Charles Cochran [piano], Jack martin [], Dennis Good [trm];
Released on the album "A Believer Sings The Truth"  (Cachet CL3-9001)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Believer_Sings_the_Truth

Listen here:






(c) Emmylou Harris (1987)  (as "Angel Band")

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angel_Band_(album)

Listen here:



Emmylou Harris – Angel Band



(c) Dolly Parton (1999)  (as "Angel Band")
In the movie "Blue Valley Songbird".

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue_Valley_Songbird

Listen here:





(c) Peasall Sisters (2000)  (as "Angel Band")
The Peasall Sisters were thrust into the spotlight when they contributed to the soundtrack for the popular movie, O Brother, Where Art Thou?, providing the singing voices of George Clooney’s daughters, the Wharvey Girls. The girls were 6, 9 and 12 years of age at the time.
Just before the end-credits they sang "Angel Band".

Listen here:




On the soundtrack of the film "O Brother Where Art Thou" the 1955-version of the Stanley Brothers is included.


In 2005, when they were a bit older (11, 14 and 17 years of age), they recorded a complete version on an album.

(c) The Peasall Sisters (2005)
Released on their album "Home To You".

Listen here:




(c) The Dead (2004)

http://www.deaddisc.com/disc/Dead_062704.htm

http://www.deaddisc.com/disc/Dead_080104.htm

http://www.deaddisc.com/songs/Angel_Band.htm

http://www.whitegum.com/~acsa/introjs.htm?/~acsa/songfile/ANGELBAN.HTM

Listen here:

https://archive.org/download/dead2004-08-01.25439.adk51le.rovjon.vegasbobby.flac16/dead2004-08-01d3t07_vbr.mp3


woensdag 23 juli 2014

Clarinet Get Away (1925) / Tar Paper Stomp (Rag) (1930) / Hot And Anxious (1931) / There's Rhythm In Harlem (1935) / In The Mood (1938)


"In the Mood" is a big band era #1 hit recorded by American bandleader Glenn Miller. It topped the charts for 13 straight weeks in 1940 in the U.S. and one year later was featured in the movie Sun Valley Serenade.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/In_the_Mood

http://www.originals.be/en/originals.php?id=1016


"In The Mood" was arranged by Joe Garland based on a pre-existing melody. The main theme, featuring repeated arpeggios rhythmically displaced, previously appeared under the title of "There's Rhythm In Harlem", recorded by the Mills Blue Rhythm Band in 1935.
But before that, the main theme was already used in "Tar Paper Stomp" credited to jazz trumpeter/bandleader Wingy Manone. Manone recorded "Tar Paper Stomp" in 1930, just months before Horace Henderson used the same tune in "Hot and Anxious", recorded by the Baltimore Bell Hops in 1931.
Under copyright rules of the day, a tune that had not been written down and registered with the copyright office could be appropriated by any musician with a good ear. A story says that after "In the Mood" became a hit, Manone was paid by Miller and his record company not to contest the copyright.
Well, maybe Wingy Manone should have given a portion of his royalties to Jimmy O'Bryant, because the riff of riffs was already prominently present in "Clarinet Get Away" by O'Bryant's Washboard Band.

Tar Paper Stomp - Wikipedia


(o) O'Bryant's Washboard Band (1925)  (as "Clarinet Get Away")
Jimmy O'Bryant (cl), Jimmy Blythe (p), Jasper Taylor (wb)
Recorded June 1925 in Chicago, Ill
Released on Paramount 12287

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Listen here:





(c) Wingy Mannone's Orchestra (1930)  (as "Tar Paper Stomp")
Wingy Manone (cornet), George Walters (clarinet), Joe Dunn (tenorsax), Maynard Spencer (piano), Dash Burkis (drums)
Recorded August 28, 1930 in Richmond, Ind.
Released in 1930 on Champion 16153 and in 1935 on Champion 40005

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Decca re-released the original master in 1937 on Decca 7425.

http://www.45worlds.com/78rpm/record/7425


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Listen here:





In 1931 the Fletcher Henderson Orchestra, disguised as Baltimore Bell Hops, used the riff for their recording of "Hot And Anxious".
The arrangement was contributed by Fletcher's brother Horace Henderson.

(c) Baltimore Bell Hops (=Fletcher Henderson Orchestra) (1931)  (as "Hot And Anxious")
Horace Henderson (piano and arrangement), Russell Smith/Rex Stewart/Bobby Stark (trumpet), Benny Morton/Claude Jones (trombone), Russell Procope (clarinet and altsax), Harvey Boone (altsax), Coleman Hawkins (clarinet, tenorsax and baritone sax), Clarence Holiday (guitar and banjo), John Kirby (string bass), Walter Johnson (drums).
Recorded March 19, 1931 in New York
Released on Columbia 2449-D

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http://www.45worlds.com/78rpm/record/2449d

Listen here (the riff begins at 42 seconds in the next MP3)

https://archive.org/download/FletcherHenderson-111-120/FletcherHendersonHisOrchestraAsBaltimoreBellHops-HotAndAnxious1931_64kb.mp3



(c) Don Redman   (as "Hot And Anxious")
Don Redman, who had played saxophone for Fletcher Henderson, also recorded "Hot And Anxious" on June 28, 1932. Besides playing the piano, Horace Henderson also did the arrangement on this recording.
Released on Brunswick 6368 and Parlophone R 2955.

Hot and Anxious - Don Redman

Listen here:





(c) Mills Blue Rhythm Band (1935)  (as "There's Rhythm In Harlem")
Saxophone player Joe Garland wrote arrangements and played in the saxophone section for the Mills Blue Rhythm Band. This group was led by Lucky Millinder and financed by Irving Mills.
Garland composed and arranged a tune that he titled “There’s Rhythm In Harlem” for this band.
J. C. Higginbotham, trombone; Wardell Jones, Shelton Hemphill (trumpet); Crawford Wethington, Joe Garland (reeds); Edgar Hayes, piano; Elmer James, bass; Neil Spencer, drums
Recorded July 9, 1935 in New York.
Released on Columbia 3071-D.


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Listen here:





(c) Edgar Hayes and his Orchestra (1938)
When Edgar Hayes formed his own band, Joe Garland went with him. Garland had composed "There's Rhythm In Harlem" some 3 years earlier. He made a new arrangement, and retitled it “In the Mood”.
Recorded on February 17, 1938 in New York.
Released on Decca 1882-B.

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Listen here:





Joe Marsala and his Chicagoans jumped into the picture on March 16, 1938, with a recording titled “Hot String Beans”, which featured a young Buddy Rich on drums. Although played at a much slower tempo, this tune bears a resemblance to Joe Garland’s “In the Mood” and a future adaptation by Artie Shaw.

(c) Joe Marsala and his Chicagoans (1938)
Recorded on March 16, 1938 in New York.
Released on Vocalion 4168

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Listen here (the "riff" starts at 1 minute and 5 seconds):





Meanwhile, Wingy Manone went into the RCA studios on April 26, 1939 to record an updated version of “Tar Paper Stomp”. This time the tune was re-titled “Jumpy Nerves”.
It was released on Bluebird B-10289.

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Then on August 1, 1939, Glenn Miller recorded the version, that has shaped the Swing Era and really hit the big time.

(c) Glenn Miller and his Orchestra (1939)  (as "In The Mood")
Recorded in New York on August 1, 1939.
Released on Bluebird B-10416.

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http://www.45worlds.com/78rpm/record/b10416us

Here's Glenn Miller's version from the movie Sun Valley Serenade.





The first vocal version was recorded just after the gigantic succes of Glenn Miller's instrumental.

(c) Al Donahue and his Orchestra.
Vocals by Paula Kelly.
Recorded in New York on November 8, 1939.
Released on Vocalion 5238.

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Listen here:





The Bluebird label couldn't stay behind and issued a competing vocal version by the Four King Sisters.

(c) The Four King Sisters with Orchestra conducted by Alvino Rey (1939)  (as "In The Mood")
Recorded at RCA Victor Studio, Hollywood, California on November 13, 1939.
Released on Bluebird B-10545.

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http://www.discogs.com/Four-King-Sisters-The-In-The-Mood-Irish-Washerwoman/release/4062267

Listen here:





The Decca label also issued a competing vocal version performed by the Merry Macs.
Recorded November 9, 1939.
Released on Decca 2842. 

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In 1951 "In The Mood" was played and recorded on a Ferranti Mark I Computer of the University Of Manchester. This was the first ever recording of a song played by a computer.

You can listen to this computerized version on the next link:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/technology/7458479.stm



(c) The Andrews Sisters (1953)  (as "In The Mood")
This well-known vocal performance of “In the Mood” by the Andrews Sisters was not recorded until July 7, 1952 in Los Angeles, with the Nelson Riddle Orchestra.
It was released in 1953 on a 78 on the Decca-label with label# 28482, which was part of a four record boxed set (not an album) #922: "Sing, Sing, Sing".
A Long Play album (Decca DL 5438) was also released.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/khiltscher/4596957508/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/khiltscher/4596340663/in/photostream/

Listen here:





(c) Johnny Maddox (1953)  (as "In The Mood")
"In The Mood" played on the piano also hit the charts.

http://www.45cat.com/record/15045us

Listen here:





(c) Hotcha Trio (1958)  (as "In The Mood")
Another variation: "In The Mood" played on 3 harmonicas by this Dutch trio.

http://www.45cat.com/record/422006penl

Listen here:





(c) Ernie Fields Orchestra (1959)  (as "In The Mood")
Ernie Fields 1959 version peaked at #4 on the charts.
Released on Rendezvous # 110

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http://www.45cat.com/record/nc591313us





(c) René And His Alligators (1962) (as "In The Mood")

http://www.45cat.com/record/266345tf

Listen here:





(c) The Shadows (1964)

http://www.45cat.com/record/seg8342

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dance_with_The_Shadows

Listen here:





(c) Bette Midler (1973)  (as "In The Mood")
Midler's version contained some additional lyrics composed by Bette herself and Barry Manilow.
Bette Midler charted with a vocal version in 1974, her version peaked at #51 in the US charts.

http://www.45cat.com/record/nc333267us

Listen here:





(c) Henhouse Five Plus Two (1977)  (as "In The Mood")
Country song parodist Ray Stevens (posing as The Henhouse Five Plus Two) had a hit with “In the Mood” when he recorded a group of “chickens” who “clucked” their way through its bars in 1977. Also known as “The Cluck-Cluck Version,” Steven’s endeavor reached number 40 on the Billboard charts in February of that year.

http://www.45cat.com/record/wbs8301

Listen here:





(c) The Star Sisters (1983)  (as "Stars on 45 Proudly presents The Star Sisters")
In 1983 Dutch girl group The Star Sisters sang "In The Mood" in a medley of songs that were popularized by the Andrews Sisters. It reached the # 1 spot on the Dutch Hitparade.

http://www.45cat.com/record/142004

Listen here:





(c) Jive Bunny And The Mastermixers (1989)  (as "Swing The Mood")
In 1989 a remix by  Jive Bunny and The Mastermixers titled Swing the Mood was also very popular. It was a # 1 hit all over Europe.

http://www.45cat.com/record/mfd001

Listen here:





(c) The Brian Setzer Orchestra (2000)  (as "Gettin' In The Mood")
Released in 2000 on the album "Vavoom!"

http://www.discogs.com/Brian-Setzer-Orchestra-The-Vavoom/release/2737872

Listen here:




maandag 14 juli 2014

Shake That Thing (1925) / Georgia Grind (1926) / Georgia Crawl (1928) / It's Tight Like That (1928) / Bottle It Up And Go (1932) / Oil It Up And Go (1939) / Step It Up And Go (1940) / Shake It Up And Go (1942)



Tampa Red's & Georgia Tom's "It's Tight Like That" is one of the most influential and the most often copied blues songs ever.

It was also sort of a precursor of the "Bottle It Up And Go / Step It Up And Go / Shake It Up And Go" songcluster.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bottle_Up_and_Go


But already in 1925 Papa Charlie Jackson recorded a song that was the real mother of the songs mentioned above: "Shake That Thing".

Lyrics "Shake That Thing":

Now down in Georgia they got a dance that's new
There ain't nothing to it, it's easy to do
They call it shake that thing, aww, shake that thing
I'm getting sick 'n' tired of telling you to shake that thing

Now it ain't no Charleston, ain't no Chicken Wing
All you got to do is to shake that thing
They call it shake that thing, aww, shake that thing
I'm getting sick 'n' tired of telling you to shake that thing

Now the old folks like it, the young folks too
The old folks showing the young folks how to do
They call it shake that thing, aww, shake that thing
I'm getting sick 'n' tired of telling you to shake that thing

Now get back to me they're dyin' to do (?)
Let your mammy show you just how to do
They call it shake that thing, aww, shake that thing
I'm getting sick 'n' tired of telling you to shake that thing

I was walking down town and stumbled and fell
My mouth jumped open like a country well
Watching 'em shake that thing, aww, watching 'em shake that thing
I'm getting sick 'n' tired of telling you to shake that thing

(Instrumental chorus)

Now Grandpa Johnson grabbed Sister Kate
He shook her just like she's taking jelly from a plate
He told her shake that thing, aww, shake that thing
I'm getting sick 'n' tired of telling you to shake that thing

Now old Uncle Jack the jelly roll king
He just got back from shaking that thing
Now shake that thing, watchin' them all, shake that thing
I'm getting sick 'n' tired of telling you to shake that thing

Now old Uncle Moe he's sick in bed
His doctor says he's almost dead
From watchin' shake that thing, watching 'em all, shake that thing
I'm getting sick 'n' tired of telling you to shake that thing

Now the folks in Georgia they done gone wild
Over this brand new dancing style
They call shake that thing, aww, shake that thing
I'm getting sick 'n' tired of telling you to shake that thing


(o) Papa Charlie Jackson (1925)  (as "Shake That Thing")
Recorded May 1925 in Chicago.
Papa Charlie Jackson: vocal and banjo
Released on Paramount 12281.
The label says "Guitar acc.", but this is actually a banjo.

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(c) The Jim-Dandies (1925)  (as "Shake That Thing")
Seymour Irick, t / Percy Glascoe, cl, as, ss / Lemuel Fowler, p / Richard Ward, d.
Recorded in New York, October 24, 1925
Released on Hamony 55-H

http://www.redhotjazz.com/jimdandies.html

Listen here:





(c) Clarence Williams' Blue Five (1925)  (as "Shake That Thing")
Eva Taylor (vocals)
Recorded on December 15, 1925 in New York City
Released on Okeh 8267

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Listen here:





(c) Ethel Waters (1925)  (as "Shake That Thing")
Acc. Pearl Wright (piano)
Recorded December 23, 1925 in New York City.
Released on Columbia 14116-D

Listen here:





(c) Abe Lyman's California Orchestra (1926)  (as "Shake That Thing")
Recorded in Chicago, February 1, 1926
Released on Brunswick 3069-B

Listen here:





(c) Viola Bartlette (1926)  (as "Shake That Thing")
Acc. probably Jimmy Blythe (piano)
Recorded March 1926 in Chicago, IL.
Released on Paramount 12345

Listen here:





(c) Jimmy O'Bryant's Famous Original Washboard Band (1926) (as "Shake That Thing")
Acc. Jimmy O'Bryant (clarinet), Jimmy Blythe (piano), W.E. Burton (washboard, banjo)
Recorded January 1926 in Chicago, IL.
Released on Paramount 12346

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Listen here:

http://www.redhotjazz.com/Songs/obryant/shakethatthing.ra

http://www.redhotjazz.com/obryant2.html



In 1926 Spencer Williams "wrote" "Georgia Grind" (not to be confused with the 1915 Fort Dabney song).
Spencer Williams' "Georgia Grind" has the same melody as "Shake That Thing" and floating lyrics:

Lyrics "Georgia Grind":

Papa, Papa, just look at Sis,
Out in the backyard shaking like this,
Doing that Georgia Grind, that old Georgia Grind.
Now everybody's talking about that old Georgia Grind.

I can shake it east. I can shake it west,
But way down south, I can shake it best,
Doing the Georgia Grind, I said, dirty Georgia Grind,
Now everybody's raving about that old Georgia Grind.

Come in here, gal. Come in here right now,
Out there trying to be bad and you don't know how,
Doing the Georgia Grind, oh, the Georgia Grind.
Everybody's trying to do the Georgia Grind.

Say Old Miss Jones was bent and gray,
Saw the Georgia Grind, threw her stick away.
She did the Georgia Grind. Yes, sir, she went crazy about the Georgia Grind.
You know one thing? Everybody's trying to do the Georgia Grind.


Louis Armstrong was the first one to record "Georgia Grind"

(c) Louis Armstrong and his Hot Five (1926)  (as "Georgia Grind")
Louis Armstrong, trumpet, vocal; Kid Ory, trombone; Johnny Dodds, clarinet; Lil Armstrong, piano, vocal; Johnny St. Cyr, banjo
Recorded in Chicago on February 26, 1926
Released on Okeh 8318

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Listen here:




Three months before Armstrong had recorded a song that also was very reminiscent of "Shake That Thing".-------->  "Gut Bucket Blues"

https://tpc.googlesyndication.com/simgad/8803478173697385856

http://www.45worlds.com/78rpm/record/nc267744us

Listen here:





(c) Duke Ellington's Washingtonians (1926) (as "Georgia Grind")
Recorded March 1926 in New York
Released on Pathe Actuelle 7504 and Perfect 104

http://www.depanorama.net/26.htm

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(c) Caroline Johnson (1926)  (as "Georgia Grind")
Recorded March 30, 1926 in New York
Released on Pathe Actuelle 7503 and Perfect 103

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(c) Edmonia Henderson (1926)
Acc ao Jelly Roll Morton (piano)
Recorded July 21, 1926 in Chicago
Released on Vocalion 1043

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(c) Thomas Morris and His Seven Hot Babies (1927)  (as "Georgia Grind")
Recorded August 17, 1926 in New York
Released on Victor 20180

http://victor.library.ucsb.edu/index.php/matrix/detail/800010292/BVE-36047-Georgia_grind

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"Georgia Grind" recorded in 1931 by the State Street Ramblers, with Jimmy Blythe, is ANOTHER SONG.




(c) Blue Lu Barker  (as "Georgia Grind")
With Danny Barker's Fly Cats
Recorded April 20, 1939
Released on Decca 7588

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In 1928 Henry Williams and Eddie Anthony recorded "Georgia Crawl".
This song is a rendition of the popular "Georgia Grind", composed by jazz pianist Spencer Williams and first recorded by Louis Armstrong in 1926.(SEE ABOVE)

The Originals © by Arnold Rypens - GEORGIA CRAWL

Lyrics "Georgia Crawl":

Come here papa, look at sis
Out in the backyard just shaking like this
Doin' the Georgia Crawl, oh Georgia Crawl
(You) don't need to buy a thing, do the Georgia Crawl

I can shake it east, shake it west
Way down south I can shake it the best

Come in this house gal, come here right now
Out there trying to do the crawl and you don't know how

Old Aunt Sally, old and gray
Doin' the Ga. Crawl til she died away


(c) Henry Williams and Eddie Anthony (1928) (as "Georgia Crawl")
Henry Williams, vcl acc own gtr; Eddie Anthony, vcl acc own fdl
Recorded in Atlanta, GA. Thursday, April 19, 1928
Released on Columbia 14328-D

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In 1928 Tampa Red and Georgia Tom recorded "It's Tight Like That", recycling the basic framework of Papa Charlie Jackson's "Shake That Thing" and Spencer Williams "Georgia Grind".

Lyrics "It's Tight Like That":

Listen here folks, gonna sing a little song
Don’t get mad, we don’t mean no harm

You know, it’s tight like that, beedle-um-bum, oh, it’s tight like that, beedle-um-bum
Don’t you hear me talking to you, I mean it’s tight like that

There was a little black rooster met a little brown hen
Made a date at the barn about half past ten

I went to see my gal, over ‘cross the hall
Found another mule kicking in my stall

Well the gal I love, she’s long and slim
When she whip it, it’s too bad, Jim

Well the rooster crowed and the hen looked ‘round
And the bum-bum billy got to carry me to town

Mama had a dog, his name was Ball
If you give a little taste he’d want it all

Solo

Uncle Bud and aunt Jane went to Chinkapin Run
Aunt Jane fell down and Uncle Bud ???

If you see my gal tell her to hurry home
I ain’t had no bread since she’s been gone

I wear my britches up above my knees
Strut my jelly with who I please

Uncle Bill came home about a half past ten
Put the key in the hole but he couldn’t get in

Me and my brother was up in the law
We seen Uncle Bill when he broke it all



(o): Tampa Red and Georgia Tom (1928)  (as "It's Tight Like That")                        
Tampa Red, guitar and vocals / Georgia Thomas Dorsey, piano and vocals
Recorded October 24, 1928 in Chicago, IL
Released on Vocalion 1216

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2 weeks later Tampa Red re-recorded "It's Tight Like That" as a jug-band version (HERE BELOW)

(c) Tampa Red's Hokum Jug Band (1928)
Recorded November 9, 1928 in Chicago, IL
Released on Vocalion 1228.

http://www.heypally78rpms.com/2014/03/tampa-reds-hokum-jug-band-vocalion-1228.html

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(c) Jimmie Noone's Apex Club Orchestra (1928)  (as "It's Tight Like That")
Recorded December 27, 1928 in Chicago, IL.
Released on Vocalion 1238-A

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(c)  Clara Smith (1929)  (as "It's Tight Like That")
Recorded January 26, 1929 in New York
Accompanied by Charlie Green (trombone) and Porter Grainger (piano)
Released on Columbia 14398-D

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(c) Leadbelly (1935)  (as "Tight Like That")
Recorded February 1935 in Wilton, Conn. for the Library Of Congress

http://lcweb2.loc.gov/diglib/ihas/loc.afc.afc9999005.509/default.html

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(c) Charles McCoy and Walter Vincent (1930)  (as "It's Hot Like That")
Recorded February 1930 in Memphis, TN
Released on Brunswick 7156

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2 years later Charlie McCoy was the first artist to record a variation of "It's Tight (Hot) Like That", called "Bottle It Up" (at a session where Tampa Red was present and he may even have accompanied Charlie McCoy).  But this record (Vocalion 1726) hasn't surfaced yet so of course it's not possible to know how it sounded and what the lyrics were.
The guys from the Memphis Jug Band (Will Shade, Charlie Burse, Jab Jones et al.) were the first to release "Bottle It Up And Go" in 1932 (released as Picaninny Jug Band and Dallas Jug Band).

Lyrics "Bottle It Up And Go":

What makes my baby love her daddy so?
Somewhere down in San Diego.

You got to bottle it up and go, dee bee dum dum.
Bottle it up and go, dap dap do.
High powered Woman,  your daddy got your water on.

I love my baby and she loves me too,
Don't [keep a price tag on what she might do]

Now I'm tellin' everybody in the neighborhood
(?????????) but she treat me good

Says looky here daddy don't do that no more
I got no (sense?) in the (?) that's all

Now looky here daddy, please don't get drunk,
When you come tonight your mamma'll pack your trunk

Now looky here mama I wish you'd tell me the truth
I got no rough stuff, I might get loose 

(c) Picaninny Jug Band (1932)  (as "Bottle It Up And Go")
Will Shade, h; Jab Jones, j; Charlie Burse, v/g; Vol Stevens, v/md; Otto gilmore, d.
Recorded August 3, 1932 in Richmond, IND.
Released (as by Dallas Jug Band) on Varsity 6025

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Released (as by Picaninny Jug Band) on Champion 16615

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In 1934 the Memphis Jug Band recorded a new version of "Bottle It Up And Go".

Here are the lyrics for that 1934 version of "Bottle It Up And Go".

I love my baby and she loves me too
Don't keep a [price] on what she do

Chorus:
We gotta bottle it up and go, ah bottle it up and go
Now high-powered mama, your daddy's got your water on.

I wanna tell everybody what it’s all about
She's low and squatty but she's built up stout

I don’t drink no whiskey, I’m hanging round your barrel
Can’t have no fun until I see that gal

I’m gonna tell my ma, what you told my pa
I wouldn’t say yes but I can’t say no

I just bought my baby a new V8
Step on the 'ccelerator don’t make me late

I’m gonna sing this song, ain’t gonna sing no more
Looky here baby I’m ready to go

Come in here momma, let me tell you the truth,
Don't start no rough stuff, I gotta get it loose

I’m gonna tell my baby for the last time
Well look here mama why don’t you take your time

(c) Charlie Burse with Memphis Jug Band (1935)
Recorded November 7, 1934 in Chicago, IL.
Released on Vocalion 03080 and Okeh 8959

http://www.document-records.com/fulldetails.asp?ProdID=BDCD-6002

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Sonny Boy Williamson's "Got The Bottle Up And Gone" (1937) and Tommy McClennan's "Bottle It And Go" (1938) are surely derived from the Memphis Jug Band versions here above, they retain the "high powered Mama/women, daddy's (or papa's) got your water on" but use a bunch of different verses.

(c) John Lee "Sonny Boy" Williamson (1937)  (as "Got The Bottle Up And Gone")
Williamson on vocal and harmonica accompanied by Big Joe Williams and Robert Lee McCoy (later known as Robert Nighthawk) on guitars.
Recorded May 5, 1937 in the Leland Hotel, Aurora, Ill.
Released on Bluebird B-7012.

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(c) Charlie Burse and his Memphis Mudcats (1939)  (as "Oil It Up And Go")
Not released at the time, but in 1991 it was released on this album

http://www.discogs.com/Various-Good-Time-Blues/release/5082008

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(c) Tommy McClennan (1940)  (as "Bottle it Up And Go")
Recorded November 22, 1939 in Chicago, IL.
Released on Bluebird B-8373

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Lyrics for McClennan's version:
http://www.songtexte.com/songtext/tommy-mcclennan/bottle-it-up-and-go-7ba83a14.html

When McClennan re-recorded the song as "Shake It Up and Go" in 1942, he used different lyrics.

(c) Tommy McClennan (1942)  (as "Shake It Up And Go")


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On July 12, 1939 Blind Boy Fuller was recording for the Vocalion-label in Memphis, TN.
3 days earlier Charlie Burse and his Memphis Mudcats had recorded "Oil It Up And Go".
Most likely J.B. Long, the manager of Blind Boy Fuller, had heard the Charlie Burse recording.
JB Long arranged that version and added a new refrain and also used some lyrics from Tampa Red and Georgia Tom's "It's Tight Like That" and retitled it "Step It Up And Go".

In Tampa Red and Georgia Tom's version it was:
Mama had a dog, his name was Ball
If you give a little taste he’d want it all

If you see my gal tell her to hurry home
I ain’t had no bread since she’s been gone

In Blind Boy Fuller's version it became:
Now, I've got a little gal whose name was Ball
Give a little bit and she took it all.

See my woman, tell her to hurry home.
Ain't had no lovin' since she been gone

Complete lyrics of Blind Boy Fuller's "Step It Up And Go":

http://www.rockabilly.nl/lyrics4/s0105.htm

(c) Blind Boy Fuller (1940)  (as "Step It Up And Go")
Acc. Blind Boy Fuller, own guitar / Oh Red, washboard
Recorded March 5, 1940 in New York City
Released in 1940 on Vocalion 05476 and later on Okeh 05476 and in 1946 on Columbia 37230.

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 In 1940 Johnny Temple recorded yet another variation of this song:

(c) Johnny Temple (1940)  (as "Fix It Up And Go")
Recorded September 23, 1940 in New York
Released on Decca 7800

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(c) B.B. King (1952) (as "Shake It Up And Go")
Recorded January 8, 1951 at the Memphis Recording Services for Modern Records.
This version was titled "Shake It Up and Go", although King confuses himself by saying 'bottle up and go' half the time.

http://www.706unionavenue.nl/64258505

http://www.discogs.com/B-B-King-And-His-Orchestra-Shake-It-Up-And-Go-My-Own-Fault-Darlin/release/4174130

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(c) Big John Greer (1953)  (as "Bottle It Up And Go")
With Mickey Baker guitar, Sam "The Man" Taylor tenor sax and Kelly Owens piano.
"Written" by Robert Brown = Washboard Sam ?

http://www.45cat.com/record/4g0002

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During his career, John Lee Hooker recorded several adaptations of "Bottle Up and Go", usually varying the lyrics. It has been identified as "one of the templates on which a significant slice of Hooker's early repertoire is based". He first recorded a solo performance as "Bundle Up and Go" in 1959 for The Country Blues of John Lee Hooker album (Riverside).

(c) John Lee Hooker (1959)  (as "Bundle Up And Go")

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Around the same time, he recorded another version as "You Gotta Shake It Up and Go", which had a group arrangement (Galaxy 716).

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http://jlhvinyl.com/e-h.html (see Galaxy part)

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Hooker's later versions are usually titled "Bottle Up and Go" and are included on the albums John Lee Hooker on Campus (1963 Vee-Jay LP 1066) and It Serves You Right to Suffer (1966 Impulse A-9103)

http://jlhvinyl.com/i-l.html  (see Impulse part)

http://www.discogs.com/John-Lee-Hooker-Money-Bottle-Up-And-Go/release/2166313



(c) Everly Brothers (1962)  (as "Step It Up And Go")
The Everly Brothers included it as "Step It Up and Go" for Instant Party! (1962) and The Everly Brothers Reunion Concert (1983).

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(c) An early incarnation of the Grateful Dead (Jerry Garcia, Bob Weir and Pigpen) under the moniker of Mother McCree's Uptown Jug Champions recorded "Shake That Thing" in 1964.
It was finally released in 1999 on CD:

https://www.discogs.com/Mother-McCrees-Uptown-Jug-Champions-Live-At-The-Top-Of-The-Tangent-1964/release/4838807

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mother McCree's Uptown Jug Champions_(album)

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(c) Leon Redbone (1981) (as "Step It Up And Go")
Released on the album "From Branch To Branch"

http://www.discogs.com/Leon-Redbone-From-Branch-To-Branch/release/2506928

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(c) Bob Dylan (1992) (as "Step It Up And Go")
Bob Dylan's version is nearly word for word derived from Blind Boy Fuller's (or better J.B. Long's).

http://bobdylan.com/songs/step-it-and-go/

http://www.bobdylanmusic.com/21192/Step-It-Up-And-Go

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More versions here:

The Originals © by Arnold Rypens - IT'S TIGHT LIKE THAT

The Originals © by Arnold Rypens - BOTTLE IT UP AND GO

Cover versions of Shake That Thing written by Papa Charlie Jackson | SecondHandSongs

Cover versions of Bottle It Up and Go written by Tommy McClennan | SecondHandSongs

Cover versions of Step It up and Go written by Blind Boy Fuller, J.B. Long | SecondHandSongs