woensdag 23 juli 2014

Clarinet Get Away (1925) / Tar Paper Stomp (Rag) (1930) / Hot And Anxious (1931) / There's Rhythm In Harlem (1935) / In The Mood (1938)


"In the Mood" is a big band era #1 hit recorded by American bandleader Glenn Miller. It topped the charts for 13 straight weeks in 1940 in the U.S. and one year later was featured in the movie Sun Valley Serenade.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/In_the_Mood

http://www.originals.be/en/originals.php?id=1016


"In The Mood" was arranged by Joe Garland based on a pre-existing melody. The main theme, featuring repeated arpeggios rhythmically displaced, previously appeared under the title of "There's Rhythm In Harlem", recorded by the Mills Blue Rhythm Band in 1935.
But before that, the main theme was already used in "Tar Paper Stomp" credited to jazz trumpeter/bandleader Wingy Manone. Manone recorded "Tar Paper Stomp" in 1930, just months before Horace Henderson used the same tune in "Hot and Anxious", recorded by the Baltimore Bell Hops in 1931.
Under copyright rules of the day, a tune that had not been written down and registered with the copyright office could be appropriated by any musician with a good ear. A story says that after "In the Mood" became a hit, Manone was paid by Miller and his record company not to contest the copyright.
Well, maybe Wingy Manone should have give a portion of his royalties to Jimmy O'Bryant, because the riff of riffs was already prominently present in "Clarinet Get Away" by O'Bryant's Washboard Band.


(o) O'Bryant's Washboard Band (1925)  (as "Clarinet Get Away")
Jimmy O'Bryant (cl), Jimmy Blythe (p), Jasper Taylor (wb)
Recorded June 1925 in Chicago, Ill
Released on Paramount 12287

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(c) Wingy Mannone's Orchestra (1930)  (as "Tar Paper Stomp")
Wingy Manone (cornet), George Walters (clarinet), Joe Dunn (tenorsax), Maynard Spencer (piano), Dash Burkis (drums)
Recorded August 28, 1930 in Richmond, Ind.
Released in 1930 on Champion 16153 and in 1935 on Champion 40005

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Decca re-released the original master in 1937 on Decca 7425.

http://www.45worlds.com/78rpm/record/7425


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In 1931 the Fletcher Henderson Orchestra, disguised as Baltimore Bell Hops, used the riff for their recording of "Hot And Anxious".
The arrangement was contributed by Fletcher's brother Horace Henderson.

(c) Baltimore Bell Hops (=Fletcher Henderson Orchestra) (1931)  (as "Hot And Anxious")
Horace Henderson (piano and arrangement), Russell Smith/Rex Stewart/Bobby Stark (trumpet), Benny Morton/Claude Jones (trombone), Russell Procope (clarinet and altsax), Harvey Boone (altsax), Coleman Hawkins (clarinet, tenorsax and baritone sax), Clarence Holiday (guitar and banjo), John Kirby (string bass), Walter Johnson (drums).
Recorded March 19, 1931 in New York
Released on Columbia 2449-D

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http://www.45worlds.com/78rpm/record/2449d

Listen here (the riff begins at 42 seconds in the next MP3)

https://archive.org/download/FletcherHenderson-111-120/FletcherHendersonHisOrchestraAsBaltimoreBellHops-HotAndAnxious1931_64kb.mp3

Or here:

http://grooveshark.com/s/Hot+and+Anxious/2EFBPj?src=5



(c) Don Redman   (as "Hot And Anxious")
Don Redman, who had played saxophone for Fletcher Henderson, also recorded "Hot And Anxious" on June 28, 1932. Besides playing the piano, Horace Henderson also did the arrangement on this recording.
Released on Brunswick 6368 and Parlophone R 2955.

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(c) Mills Blue Rhythm Band (1935)  (as "There's Rhythm In Harlem")
Saxophone player Joe Garland wrote arrangements and played in the saxophone section for the Mills Blue Rhythm Band. This group was led by Lucky Millinder and financed by Irving Mills.
Garland composed and arranged a tune that he titled “There’s Rhythm In Harlem” for this band.
J. C. Higginbotham, trombone; Wardell Jones, Shelton Hemphill (trumpet); Crawford Wethington, Joe Garland (reeds); Edgar Hayes, piano; Elmer James, bass; Neil Spencer, drums
Recorded July 9, 1935 in New York.
Released on Columbia 3071-D.


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(c) Edgar Hayes and his Orchestra (1938)
When Edgar Hayes formed his own band, Joe Garland went with him. Garland had composed "There's Rhythm In Harlem" some 3 years earlier. He made a new arrangement, and retitled it “In the Mood”.
Recorded on February 17, 1938 in New York.
Released on Decca 1882-B.

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Joe Marsala and his Chicagoans jumped into the picture on March 16, 1938, with a recording titled “Hot String Beans”, which featured a young Buddy Rich on drums. Although played at a much slower tempo, this tune bears a resemblance to Joe Garland’s “In the Mood” and a future adaptation by Artie Shaw.

(c) Joe Marsala and his Chicagoans (1938)
Recorded on March 16, 1938 in New York.
Released on Vocalion 4168

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Listen here (the "riff" starts at 1 minute and 5 seconds):





Meanwhile, Wingy Manone went into the RCA studios on April 26, 1939 to record an updated version of “Tar Paper Stomp”. This time the tune was re-titled “Jumpy Nerves”.
It was released on Bluebird B-10289.

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Then on August 1, 1939, Glenn Miller recorded the version, that has shaped the Swing Era and really hit the big time.

(c) Glenn Miller and his Orchestra (1939)  (as "In The Mood")
Recorded in New York on August 1, 1939.
Released on Bluebird B-10416.

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http://www.45worlds.com/78rpm/record/b10416us

Here's Glenn Miller's version from the movie Sun Valley Serenade.





The first vocal version was recorded just after the gigantic succes of Glenn Miller's instrumental.

(c) Al Donahue and his Orchestra.
Vocals by Paula Kelly.
Recorded in New York on November 8, 1939.
Released on Vocalion 5238.

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Listen here:





The Bluebird label couldn't stay behind and issued a competing vocal version by the Four King Sisters.

(c) The Four King Sisters with Orchestra conducted by Alvino Rey (1939)  (as "In The Mood")
Recorded at RCA Victor Studio, Hollywood, California on November 13, 1939.
Released on Bluebird B-10545.

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http://www.discogs.com/Four-King-Sisters-The-In-The-Mood-Irish-Washerwoman/release/4062267

Listen here:





The Decca label also issued a competing vocal version performed by the Merry Macs.
Recorded November 9, 1939.
Released on Decca 2842. 

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In 1951 "In The Mood" was played and recorded on a Ferranti Mark I Computer of the University Of Manchester. This was the first ever recording of a song played by a computer.

You can listen to this computerized version on the next link:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/technology/7458479.stm



(c) The Andrews Sisters (1953)  (as "In The Mood")
This well-known vocal performance of “In the Mood” by the Andrews Sisters was not recorded until July 7, 1952 in Los Angeles, with the Nelson Riddle Orchestra.
It was released in 1953 on a 78 on the Decca-label with label# 28482, which was part of a four record boxed set (not an album) #922: "Sing, Sing, Sing".
A Long Play album (Decca DL 5438) was also released.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/khiltscher/4596957508/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/khiltscher/4596340663/in/photostream/

Listen here:





(c) Johnny Maddox (1953)  (as "In The Mood")
"In The Mood" played on the piano also hit the charts.

http://www.45cat.com/record/15045us

Listen here:





(c) Hotcha Trio (1958)  (as "In The Mood")
Another variation: "In The Mood" played on 3 harmonicas by this Dutch trio.

http://www.45cat.com/record/422006penl

Listen here:





(c) Ernie Fields Orchestra (1959)  (as "In The Mood")
Ernie Fields 1959 version peaked at #4 on the charts.
Released on Rendezvous # 110

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http://www.45cat.com/record/nc591313us





(c) René And His Alligators (1962) (as "In The Mood")

http://www.45cat.com/record/266345tf

Listen here:




(c) The Shadows (1964)

http://www.45cat.com/record/seg8342

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dance_with_The_Shadows

Listen here:





(c) Bette Midler (1973)  (as "In The Mood")
Midler's version contained some additional lyrics composed by Bette herself and Barry Manilow.
Bette Midler charted with a vocal version in 1974, her version peaked at #51 in the US charts.

http://www.45cat.com/record/nc333267us

Listen here:





(c) Henhouse Five Plus Two (1977)  (as "In The Mood")
Country song parodist Ray Stevens (posing as The Henhouse Five Plus Two) had a hit with “In the Mood” when he recorded a group of “chickens” who “clucked” their way through its bars in 1977. Also known as “The Cluck-Cluck Version,” Steven’s endeavor reached number 40 on the Billboard charts in February of that year.

http://www.45cat.com/record/wbs8301

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(c) The Star Sisters (1983)  (as "Stars on 45 Proudly presents The Star Sisters")
In 1983 Dutch girl group The Star Sisters sang "In The Mood" in a medley of songs that were popularized by the Andrews Sisters. It reached the # 1 spot on the Dutch Hitparade.

http://www.45cat.com/record/142004

Listen here:





(c) Jive Bunny And The Mastermixers (1989)  (as "Swing The Mood")
In 1989 a remix by  Jive Bunny and The Mastermixers titled Swing the Mood was also very popular. It was a # 1 hit all over Europe.

http://www.45cat.com/record/mfd001

Listen here:





(c) The Brian Setzer Orchestra (2000)  (as "Gettin' In The Mood")
Released in 2000 on the album "Vavoom!"

http://www.discogs.com/Brian-Setzer-Orchestra-The-Vavoom/release/2737872

Listen here: