zaterdag 4 oktober 2014

My Black Mama Part 1 (1930) / Milk Cow Blues (1934) / Milkcow's Calf Blues (1937) / Milkcow Blues Boogie (1954)


http://www.originals.be/en/originals.php?id=4175

"Milk Cow Blues" is a very influential blues-song, recorded by Kokomo Arnold in 1934. In the course of time it was covered a lot, sometimes with adapted lyrics and/or music.
But even Kokomo Arnold was influenced by other artists, when he wrote "Milk Cow Blues"


(o) Son House (1930)  ("My Black Mama Part 1")
Recorded in Grafton, Wisconsin, May 28, 1930.
Released on Paramount 13042.

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Son House’s “My Black Mama Part 1” was an important forerunner to Kokomo Arnold’s "Milk Cow Blues" for several reasons. Stylistically, it is performed in a country-blues manner similar to Arnold’s with House’s open-tuned guitar the only foil to his voice.
And lyrically  there are also similarities: Verse 5 from "My Black Mama" was almost literally used by Kokomo Arnold.

Verse 5
Well, you see my milk cow, tell her hurry home
I aint had no milk since that cow been gone,
If you see my milk cow, tell her hurry home,
Yeah, I aint had no milk since that cow been gone.

http://www.originals.be/en/originals.php?id=4326

http://songmeanings.com/songs/view/3530822107858731328/

Listen here:

 

And the famous opening-line "All in good morning, I said, blues how do you do", could have been derived from Son House's "Walking Blues", which contained the frase "Good morning blues, blues how do you do"
Son House's "Walking Blues" was recorded on May 28, 1930 in Grafton, Wisconsin. (on the same date as the above mentioned "My Black Mama part I")




One other notable addition to the milk-cow blues tradition leading up to Arnold’s work was recorded by Big Bill Broonzy in New York in 1934. So that's even 6 months before Kokomo Arnold's "Milk Cow Blues"

(o) Big Bill (Broonzy) (1934) 
Recorded March 23, 1934 in Chicago
Released on Bluebird B 5476.

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Verse 1
When I got up this morning, she had ev’ry dime I had,
When I got up this morning, she had ev’ry dime I had,
I said, “That’s all right, milk cow, your daddy understands.”
Verse 2
My milk cow had me fooled, she had t’ have ev’rything sheneed,
My milk cow had me fooled, she had t’ have ev’rything sheneed,
Now, these times they done got hard, baby, she can’t eatburs and weeds.
Verse 3
I haven’t seen my milk cow in three long weeks today,
I haven’t seen my milk cow, mama, three long weeks today,
I haven’t had no rich cream, mama, since my milk cowstrolled away.
Verse 4
Have you seen a big brown cow? She had no horns at all.
Have you seen a big brown cow? She had no horns at all.
You don’t need no chair to milk her, she will back right inyour stall.
Verse 5
If you see my milk cow, please drive her to my door,
Mind, if you see my milk cow, please drive her to my door,
I was really good to my milk cow, I wonder, “Where did mymilk cow go?”

Listen here:




Kokomo Arnold's recordings of “Milk Cow Blues” though, were most influential on later artists. Arnold recorded no fewer than four different versions of “Milk Cow Blues” within approximately one year. He waxed the first, "Milk Cow Blues", on September 10, 1934, and the second, "Milk Cow Blues No. 2", on January 18, 1935. Arnold cut “Milk Cow Blues Nos. 3 and 4" during the same recording session on September 11, 1935. All four performances feature similar guitar accompaniment figures and tunes but different texts, the common thread being the ongoing theme of a lost milk cow.

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(c) Kokomo Arnold (1934)  (as "Milk Cow Blues")

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Listen here:



(c) Kokomo Arnold (1935) (as "Milk Cow Blues No. 2")

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Listen here:



(c) Kokomo Arnold (1935) (as "Milk Cow Blues No. 3")

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(c) Kokomo Arnold (1935) (as "Milk Cow Blues No. 4")

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Kokomo Arnold's 1st version was subsequently covered by the Birmingham Serenaders ( 1935), Pinewood Tom (=Josh White) (1935), Bumble Bee Slim (1935) and Cliff Bruner (1937)

(c) Birmingham Serenaders (1935)
Probably Clarence Williams (piano and voc)
Accompanied by Ed Allen, Charlie Gaines,Cecil Scott and Floyd Casey.
Recorded February 1, 1935 in New York City
Released on Decca 7060

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Listen here:  Clarence Williams – Milk Cow Blues


(c) Pinewood Tom (=Josh White) (1935) 
Accompanied by Clarence Williams on the piano.
Recorded February 13, 1935 in New York City.

Released on Banner 33361, Conqueror 8479, Oriole 8440, Romeo 5440, Melotone M 13328,

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And Perfect 0316

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Listen here:





(c) Amos (Easton) (better known as Bumble Bee Slim) (1935)
Accompanied by Big Bill Broonzy (guitar) and Horace Malcolm (piano)
Recorded February 27, 1935 in Chicago.
Released on Bluebird B 5880 and Montgomery Ward M 4837

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Listen here: Bumble Bee Slim – Milk Cow Blues



(c) Cliff Bruner's Texas Wanderers (1937)  (as "Milk Cow Blues")
With vocals by Leo Railey.
Recorded February 5, 1937 in San Antonio, Texas
Released on Decca 5334.

http://www.45worlds.com/78rpm/record/5334us

Listen here:





(c) George Noble (1935)  (as "New Milk Cow Blues")
Credited to Noble, but not particularly a "new" version of "Milk Cow Blues".
Noble sings the 1st verse of Kokomo Arnold's version and then 4 variations of the 4th verse of Kokomo's version.
Recorded February 11, 1935 in Chicago
Released on Vocalion 02905

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Listen here:





(c) Kansas City "Casey" Bill Weldon (1935) (as "What's The Matter With My Milk Cow?")
Recorded March 25, 1935 in Chicago.
Released on Vocalion 03078.

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Weldon recorded his "own" version of "Milk Cow blues" with some new lyrics.

Listen here:




(c) Robert Johnson (1937)  (as "Milkcow's Calf Blues")
And this was Robert Johnson's re-worked version of "Milk Cow Blues".
Recorded June 20, 1937 in Dallas, Texas
Released on Perfect 7-10-65

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Also released on Vocalion 03665

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And on Conqueror 8944

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Tell me, milk cow, what on earth is wrong with you?
Tell me, milk cow, what on earth is wrong with you?
Well, well, you have a new calf, hoo hoo, and your milk is turnin' blue

Your calf is hungry, and I believe he needs a suck
(spoken: Now, you know that calf done got hungry)
Your calf is hungry, and I believe he needs a suck
Well, now, but the milk is turnin' blue, hoo hoo, and I believe he's outta luck

Now I feel like milkin' and my, cow won't come
I feel like churnin' it and my, milk won't turn
I'm cryin' plea-hease, please, don't do me wrong
You can give-a right milk and butter, now, baby, you-hoo, will stay at home

My milk cow been ramblin', hoo hoo, for miles around
My milk cow been ramblin', hoo hoo, for miles around
She been troublin' some other bull cow, hoo hoo
Lord, in this man's town

http://blueslyrics.tripod.com/lyrics/robert_johnson/milkcows_calf_blues_take_1.htm

Listen here to both takes of the song that Robert Johnson recorded in 1937:




(c) Johnny Lee Wills And His Boys (1941)  (as "Milk Cow Blues")
Recorded April 28, 1941 Sound Recording Studio, Dallas, TX –
Johnny Lee Wills [banjo], Cotton Thompson [vcl/fiddle], Lester "Junior" Barnard [el gt], Harley Huggins [gt], Luther Jay "Luke" Wills [bass], Millard Kelso [piano]
Released on Decca 5985

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Johnny Lee Wills version was a very influential Western version, with 2 new verses.
It starts with verse 4 and 3 (in that order) of the 1934 Kokomo Arnold-version, and than adds the new verses.

Verse 1
Well, I woke up this mornin’ looked outdoors,
I can tell my milk cow, I can tell by the way she lows.
If you see my milk cow, please, drive her on home,
’Cause ain’t had no milk and butter, woo, since my cow’s been gone.

Verse 2
Well, you’ve got to treat me right,day by day,
Get out your little prayer book, get down on your knees and pray,
’Cause you’re gonna need, you’re gonna need my help someday.
Yes, you’re going to be sorry, woo, you treat me this way.

Verse 3
Piano Solo chorus

Verse 4
Well, good evenin’, don’t that sun look good going down?
Well, good evenin’, don’t that sun look good going down?
Now, don’t your bed look lonesome when your lover ain’t around

Verse 5
I’ve tried everything baby to get along with you,
And now I’m going to tell you what I’m gonna do.
I’m going to stop cryin’ and leave you alone.
If you don’t believe I’m leavin’, you can count the days I’m gone.
’Cause you won’t see, you won’t see my sweet face no more.
Yeah, you’ll just be wonderin’, baby, where in this world I’m gone

Listen here:



Maybe Johnny Lee Wills borrowed this line Now, don’t your bed look lonesome when your lover ain’t around from Freddie Spruell's "Milk Cow Blues" (SEE BOTTOM OF THIS TOPIC)

The Johnny Lee Wills arrangement was subsequently covered by Jack Guthrie (1946),  Bob Wills (1946), Maddox Brothers & Rose (1947), Elvis Presley (1955) and Jimmy Rodgers Snow (1956),                  


(c) Jack Guthrie (1946)
Recorded March 18, 1946 in Hollywood, CA
Finally released on the next album:

http://www.allmusic.com/album/milk-cow-blues-mw0000004327


(c) Bob Wills (1946)  (as "Brain Cloudy Blues")
Recorded September 5, 1946 at CBS Studio (Radio Station KNX), Hollywood, CA
Released on Columbia 37313
Except for the 1st verse, Bob Wills excactly copied his brother Johnny Lee's 1941 arrangement.

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Listen here:




(c) Maddox Bros. and Rose (1947)
Recorded ca. August 1947 Associated Studio, Pasadena, CA –
Maddox Brothers and Rose (Rose Maddox [ld vcl], Henry Maddox [vcl/gt], Jimmy Winkle [ld gt], Cal Maddox [rh gt/harmonica], Cliff Maddox [mandolin], Bud Duncan [steel], Fred Maddox [vcl/bass], Don Maddox [vcl/fiddle]

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Listen here:




(c) Elvis Presley (1955)  (as "Milkcow Blues Boogie")
Recorded at Sun Studios on December 10, 1954.
Scotty Moore on guitar, Bill Black on bass, and Elvis on vocals and guitar.
Released on Sun 215

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http://www.45cat.com/record/215us

Listen here:




(c) Moon Mullican and the Showboys (1946) ( as "New Milk Cow Blues")
Vocals:  Cotton Thompson, who also handled the vocals on the Johnny Lee Wills version.
Recorded October 1946, Cliff Herring Studio, 1705 W. 7th St., Ft. Worth, TX
This version was also credited to Thompson, because he cleverly re-wrote the lyrics.

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Listen here:

http://www.jazz-on-line.com/a/mp3o/KIN578A.mp3


(c) Ricky Nelson (1960)
Recorded October 26. 1960 at Master Recorders, 533 North Fairfax Ave., Hollywood, CA -
Ricky Nelson [vcl/rh gt], James Burton [gt], Joe Osborn [bass], Richie Frost [drums], Ray Johnson [piano] + vocal chorus) [Richie Frost [percussion] overdubbed on November 11 at United Recording Corp.]
Released on Imperial X5707

http://www.45cat.com/record/5707

Ricky Nelson only used the newly added lyrics from the Johnny Lee Wills version.

Well, I've tried everything to get along with you
Now I'm gonna tell you what I'm gonna do
I'm gonna quit my cryin'
I'm gonna leave you alone
If you don't believe I'm leavin'
You can count the days I'm gone
I'm gonna leave.

You're gonna need your lovin' daddy some day
Aw, when you're gonna be sorry
'Cause you treated me this way

Aw please, don't that sun look good goin' down
Yeah please, don't that sun look good goin' down
Don't that old moon look lonesome when you're baby's not around.

All right.

Well, I've tried everything to get along with you
Now I'm gonna tell you what I'm gonna do
I'm gonna quit my cryin'
I'm gonna leave you alone
If you don't believe I'm leavin'
You can count the days I'm gone
I'm gonna leave.

You're gonna need your lovin' daddy some day
Aw, when you're gonna be sorry
'Cause you treated me this way.

Hey, hey, hey, yeah
Hey, hey, hey, all right
Hey, hey, hey, yeah, all right, ooh...

Listen here:




The Ricky Nelson arrangement was subsequently covered by

The Kinks (1965),

Listen here: http://grooveshark.com/s/Milk+Cow+Blues/3KEAJS?src=5

Chocolate Watch Band (1968),

Listen here: http://grooveshark.com/s/Milk+Cow+Blues/2u2GrF?src=5

Aerosmith (1977),

Listen here: http://grooveshark.com/s/Milk+Cow+Blues/4GaVpV?src=5

Dead Moon (1990),

Listen here: http://grooveshark.com/s/Milk+Cow+Blues/5gCpAb?src=5

Nashville Pussy (1997),

Listen here: http://grooveshark.com/s/Milk+Cow+Blues/4IUp9b?src=5

Flamin Groovies (1991).


In 1967 The Chocolate Watch Band had already recorded a slightly re-worked version of "Milk Cow Blues" (as "Don't Need Your Lovin"). Listen here: http://grooveshark.com/s/Don+t+Need+Your+Lovin/2u33as?src=5

This version was covered by The Nomads in 1983, who used the "Milkcow Blues" title again.

Listen here: http://grooveshark.com/s/Milkcow+Blues/1LJCYe?src=5


Bob Dylan was certainly familiar with "Milk Cow Blues".
The 1st verse from his 1963 song "Quit your lowdown Ways" was literally taken from the 1934 Kokomo Arnold song.
"Quit your lowdown ways" was an outtake from the "Freewheelin" sessions.
Recorded September 7, 1962 in the Columbia Recording Studio A, New York City.
Released in 1991 on "The Bootleg Series, Vol 1-3 : Rare and Unreleased".

Oh, you can read out your Bible
You can fall down on your knees, pretty mama
And pray to the Lord
But it ain’t gonna do no good
You’re gonna need
You’re gonna need my help someday
Well, if you can’t quit your sinnin’
Please quit your low down ways

http://www.bobdylan.com/us/songs/milk-cow-blues#us/songs/quit-your-low-down-ways

Listen here: http://grooveshark.com/s/Quit+Your+Lowdown+Ways/3yvhDK?src=5

Another outtake from the "Freewheelin" sessions was titled "Milkcow's Calf Blues", which is kind of an amalgation of the original version by Kokomo Arnold and the Robert Johnson version.
Recorded April 25, 1962 in the Columbia Recording Studio A, New York City.

Listen here: http://grooveshark.com/s/Milkcow+s+Calf+Blues/2YZ6Uk?src=5


(c) Robert Palmer (2003)  (as "Milkcow's Calf Blues")

Released on the album "Drive".



(c) Eric Clapton (2004)  (as "Milkcow's Calf Blues")

Released on his album "Me and Mr Johnson".



(c) Rory Block (2006)  (as "Milkcow's Calf Blues")

Relaesed on her album "The Lady and Mr Johnson".

Listen here: http://grooveshark.com/s/Milkcow+s+Calf+Blues+Album+Version/3JRAfO?src=5



In 1930 Sleepy John Estes recorded a song titled "Milk Cow Blues", which, except for the title, is completely different, in melody and in lyrics.

http://www.originals.be/en/originals.php?id=4174


And than there is Papa Freddie's "Milk Cow Blues"(1926), which has a similar title and theme: his "Milk Cow" is gone.
Melodically, Papa Freddie's "Milk Cow Blues" is closely related to "Crowin Rooster Blues" / "Minglewood Blues" / Roll And Tumble Blues".  (SEE:http://jopiepopie.blogspot.nl/2014/09/crowing-rooster-1927-minglewood-blues.html )

"Milk Cow Blues"
Recorded in Chicago on June 25, 1926
Matrix (9793‑A)
Released on Okeh 8422

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Listen to my story, now, please listen to my song
Can't you imagine how I feel, now, have mercy, my real milk cow gone

She's a full-blood Jersey, I'm gon' tell you boys the way I know
Yes, she's a full-blood Jersey, I'm gon' tell you boys the way I know
People just screamin' for my milk cow, I don't care where my Jersey go

I've been on 35th, listen, boys, I've been on 39th
I've been on 35th, listen, boys, I've been on 39th
I rambled the whole South Side o' town tryin' to find this real milk cowr (sic) of mine

She's a full-blood Jersey, I'm gonna tell you boys the way I know
She's a full-blood Jersey, I'm gonna tell you boys the way I know
People just screamin' for my milk cow, I don't care where my milk cow go

Sayin', my bed seem lonesome, my pillow, now it sure won't do
Sayin', my bed seem lonesome, my pillow, babe, it sure won't do
I wakes up hours of midnight, I really had those milk cow blues

SOLO: 4 Bars
Uhh, baby, listen, hoo-hoo-hoo
Can't you look in my face now, brown, and tell I've got those milk cow blues

Listen, Hiiiiii, sugar, listen, hii-hii-hii
Listen, Hiiiiii, sugar, listen, hii-hii-hii
Can't you imagine how I feel now, I done told my real milk cow bye-bye

Listen here:






If you want to dig deeper in "Milk Cow Blues" here's a case study by Jean Boyd and Patrick Kelly.
It's a 20 page PDF-file which can be opened in the next link:

http://gato-docs.its.txstate.edu/center-for-texas-music-history/journals/volume-12/Vol_12_Milk-Cow-Blues/Vol_12_Milk%20Cow%20Blues.pdf




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