woensdag 8 mei 2013

She's Coming Around The Mountain (1924)



"She'll Be Coming 'Round the Mountain" (also sometimes called simply "Coming 'Round the Mountain") is a folk song often categorized as children's music. It is a derivation of a Negro spiritual known as "When the Chariot Comes".

The version in The New England magazine. / Volume 25, Issue 6, p. 718 is said to be the first appearance of "When the Chariot Comes", forerunner of "Coming Round the Mountain."



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"When the Chariot Comes" is similar to "Old Ship of Zion" VIII ("Don't Ye View Dat Ship"), from "Fifty Cabin and Plantation Songs", 1874, Thomas P. Fenner (SEE Mudcat thread 41005: Old Ship of Zion VIII )
Also note that similar verses are in other versions of the "Old Ship of Zion." Some of these verses were noted as early as 1850 (see Epstein) and lines such as "reel and totter" may be applied to both ships and chariots.
Whether these Negro spirituals originally were adapted from White hymns or whether the early White gospel singers adapted Negro spirituals is open to dispute.


Henry Whitter was the first one to record a version of "She's Coming Around The Mountain"
Recorded in New York on February 25, 1924 for the OKEH-label: OKEH 40063.

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Next in line Vernon Dalhart and Company, recorded "She's Comin' 'Round The Mountain" in New York on August 3, 1925 on Edison 51608.
Vernon Dalhart: vocal
Murray Kellner: fiddle, harmonica
Carson Robison: guitar

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Same recording was also issued on Edison Blue Amberol cylinder #5052

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The version by Gid Tanner and his Skillet-Lickers was recorded in Atlanta, GA Wednesday, November 3, 1926

Clayton McMichen, f 
Gid Tanner, f /hv
Bert Layne, f 
Fate Norris, bj
Riley Puckett, g /lv 
unidentified, sp.

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(c) Roe Brothers and Morrell 1927 ("She’ll Be Coming Around The Mountain")
Fred Roe, f; Lewis Morrell, bj-1; Henry Roe, g; unidentified, v duet.
Recorded Atlanta, GA Monday, March 28, 1927
Matrix 143783-1
Released on Columbia 15156-D



(c) Hill Billies:
"She'll Be Comin' 'Round the Mountain"
May 16, 1927 on Vocalion 5240.
The same recording was released on Brunswick 181 as by Al Hopkins and his Buckle Busters





(c) Parman and Snyder 1928 ("She’ll Be Coming Around The Mountain")
Dick Parman, Elmer Snyder, v duet; acc. unknown; Dick Parman, g.
Recorded February 20, 1928 in Memphis, TN
Matrix 400273-B
Released on Okeh 45302


(c) Uncle Dave Macon (with Sam McGee) (duet with banjo and guitar)
Recorded July 26, 1928 on Brunswick 263





(c) Pickard Family "She'll Be Comin' 'Round the Mountain"
Recorded December 13, 1928
Label: Banner 6311, Paramount 3213, Oriole 1502, Conqueror 7251, etc





(c) H.M. Barnes and His Blue Ridge Ramblers (1929) ("She’ll Be Comin' 'Round The Mountain When She Comes")
Recorded January 29, 1929 in New York.
Released on Brunswick 310.

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(c) Cotton Top Mountain Sanctified Singers 1929 ("She's Coming 'Round the Mountain")
Recorded February 28, 1929 in Chicago
Released on Brunswick 7119.

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(c) Hollywood Dance Orchestra ("She'll Be Comin' 'Round the Mountain") (vocal Irving Kaufman)
Label: Conqueror 7580 + Jewel 5978
Matrix 9768=3
Recorded May 27, 1930





Although the first printed version of "She'll Be Coming 'Round the Mountain" appeared in Carl Sandburg's The American Songbag in 1927, the song is believed to have been written during the late 1800s. The song was based on an old Negro spiritual titled "When the Chariot Comes", which is sung to the same melody. During the 19th century it spread through Appalachia where the lyrics were changed into their current form. The song was later sung by railroad work gangs in the Midwestern United States in the 1890s. The song's style is reminiscent of the call and response structure of many folk songs of the time, where one person would shout the first line and others repeat.
While it is not entirely clear who the "she" in the song refers to, there are various plausible interpretations. One interpretation suggests that "she" is the train that will be coming through the tracks that are being laid out by workers.
Carl Sandburg, in The American Songbag, suggests that "she" refers to union organizer Mary Harris "Mother" Jones going to promote formation of labor unions in the Appalachian coal mining camps.


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Another song, "Charmin' Betsy", noted in 1908, is clearly related to "Coming Round The Mountain":
I'm comin' round the mountain, Charmin' Betsy,
I'm comin' round the mountain, 'fore I leave,
An' if I never more see you,
Take this ring, an' think of me.
An' wear this ring I give you,
An' wear it on your right han',
An' when I'm dead an' forgotten,
Don't give it to no other man.


RECORDINGS: Fiddlin' John Carson, "Charming Betsy" (OKeh 40363, 1925)
Cleve Chaffin & the McClung Brothers, "Rock House Gamblers" (c. 1930; on RoughWays1)
Georgia Organ Grinders, "Charming Betsy" (Columbia 15415-D, 1929)
Davis & Nelson, "Charming Betsy" (QRS 9011, c. 1929)
Land Norris, "Charming Betsy" (OKeh 45033, c. 1926; rec. 1925)
Virgil Perkins & Jack Sims, "Goin' Around the Mountain" (on AmSkBa)

Jim Jackson, "Going Around The Mountain" (Victor 38525) (rec. 1928)
 Henry Thomas, "Charming Betsy" (Vocalion 1468, 1930 [rec. 1929]; on Cornshuckers2)








Land Norris, "Charming Betsy" (OKeh 45033, c. 1926; rec. 1925)

Listen here:

http://www.juneberry78s.com/sounds/jb45005-16.mp3




(c) Tiny Bradshaw recorded SHE'LL BE COMING ROUND THE MOUNTAIN on October 3, 1934
released on the B-side of MISTER, WILL YOU SERENADE? (Decca 317)




(c) Fats Waller 1939 (radio transcription recorded on November 20, 1939)

http://www.cduniverse.com/productinfo.asp?pid=1179625&style=music&fulldesc=T


And even the natives from Pingo Pongo sang it in this cartoon from 1938.
They sing it at 4 minutes and 25 seconds in the next YT:




In 1949 the song was developed into a complete cartoon: "Comin Round The Mountain".



And in 1951 the song was developed into a complete Abbott and Costello-movie: "Comin' Round The Mountain"



(c) Pete Seeger 1953 on the album: "American Folk Songs For Children"




Alvin and the Chipmunks covered the song for their 1960 album Sing Again with The Chipmunks.





The German Songs "Von den blauen Bergen kommen wir" and "Tante aus Marokko" as well as the Dutch song "Tante uit Marokko" (which are mostly sung at Scouting events and during hiking) share the same melody and some elements from the text.

(c) een tante in Marokko

Ik heb een tante in Marokko
en ze komt, hiep hoi (2x)
ik heb een tante in Marokko,
een tante in Marokko, een tante in Marokko
en ze komt, Hiep hoi
zing ik ay ay yippie, yippie yee
zing ik ay ay yippie, yippie yee
zing ik ay ay yippie, ay ay yippie
ay, ay yippie yippie yee, hiep hoi
en ze komt op twee kamelen
als ze komt, hobbel, hobbel, enz
en dan braden we een varken
aan het spit, knor, knor, enz
en wat zullen we lekker eten
als ze komt, nou, nou,enz



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kyvc-RoUAcA

http://www.liedjesland.com/Liedjes/kinderliedjes/tante_uit_marokko/tante_uit_marokko.htm

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Ww05sBsjgY


(c) Goldy und Peter de Vries 1949 recorded a German version as "Von den blauen Bergen kommen wir" on the Polydor-label
Recorded in Germany on May 2, 1949.

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German lyrics: Heinz Woezel 

http://www.fuenfzigerjahresaenger.de/Lexikon/Woezel.htm


(c) Bob und Eddy 1960 ("Von den blauen Bergen kommen wir")
  Bob Hill and Eddy Börner = Wolfgang Roloff (= Ronny) and Wolfgang Börner


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(c) Capers 1961 (as "Rockin' Round The Mountain") on the Dore-label.




(c) Tielman Brothers 1962


The Tielman Brothers recorded live at the Jolly Bar, Hanau (Germany) in July 1962. Their instrumental "Von den blauen Bergen kommen wir" (German hit in 1949 for Goldy & Peter de Vries) is an adaption from the traditional folksong "She'll be coming around the mountain"


(c) Connie Francis (1965) (recorded 1961)

http://www.45cat.com/record/k13325



(c) Booker T Washington White has recorded a version in 1963 under the supervision of Chris Strachwitz.
http://www.arhoolie.com/arhoolie-box-set/arhoolie-40th-anniversary-box-set-various-artists.html
Click on the next link to listen to Booker White's cover-version:

http://www.melodycenta.com/flash_player/flash_black.php?type=1&id=2571190


(c) Muddy Waters recorded "Coming Round The Mountain" on May 2, 1963.
Released on the The Chess Box (Chess LP 6040/6050)

Listen to Muddy here:




(c) Bob Dylan and The Band 1967 ("Comin' Round The Mountain") on Genuine Basement Tapes 4

http://www.discogs.com/viewimages?release=2370931


(c) Buffy Sainte-Marie (1973)  ("She'll Be Comin' Round The Mountain When She Comes")

http://www.discogs.com/Buffy-Sainte-Marie-Quiet-Places/master/243454


(c) John Lennon (1978) (Home Recording)



http://www.jpgr.co.uk/boot_hmc008.html


Sesame Street Pageants: Prairie Dawn, Ernie, Herry and Cookie Monster perform "She'll Be Comin' 'Round the Mountain" in a 1976 episode of Sesame Street.
Cookie Monster, playing the heroine in this season's pageant, can't seem to grasp the concept of going "around" the mountain until Prairie lures him with a cookie.

http://muppet.wikia.com/wiki/Episode_0892



Ned Flanders of The Simpsons sang his own variation in "The Bart of War".
http://www.lardlad.com/assets/quotes/season14/EABF16.shtml

We'll be safe inside our fortress when they come.
We'll be safe from creeps and killers when they come.
Unless they have a blow-torch
Or a poison gas injector,
Then I don't know what will happen when they come!


Listen here to the version from The Simpsons episode "Bart Of War":

http://download.lardlad.com/sounds/season14/bartofwar7.mp3



(c) Neil Young and Crazy Horse 2012 ("Jesus' Chariot")






NOT TO BE CONFUSED with Eddy Christiani's "Ouwe Taaie" (Yippy Yippy Yay) (1943, which was an original composition by Cees van Noordwijk, Ronny Luco, Jacques Hartman and Eddy Christiani


And NOT TO BE CONFUSED with Winny Dobber's "Zing van Yippie Yippie Yee" (1948)


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