zaterdag 29 augustus 2015

Rising Sun Blues (1934) / Rounder's Luck (1935) / House Of The Rising Sun (1941) / In New Orleans (1944) / Le Pénitencier (1964)



"The House of the Rising Sun" is a traditional folk song, sometimes called "Rising Sun Blues". It tells of a life gone wrong in New Orleans; many versions also urge a sibling to avoid the same fate. The most successful commercial version, recorded in 1964 by the English rock group The Animals, was a number one hit.

Like many classic folk ballads, the authorship of "The House of the Rising Sun" is uncertain. Musicologists say that it is based on the tradition of broadside ballads such as The Unfortunate Rake of the 18th century, and that English emigrants took the song to America where it was adapted to its later New Orleans setting. But that's only a theory. " Unfortunate Rake" only bears a thematical resemblance to "House Of The Rising Sun".
The house the song refers to is in most cases unmistakeably a whorehouse, but the original house, the one all these Houses Of The Rising Sun where named after, could also have been a prison, as the ball & chain-verse at the end of most song versions implies.
There is also a mention of a house-like pub called the "Rising Sun" in the classic Black Beauty published in 1877, set in London, England, which may have influenced the title.

http://www.originals.be/en/originals.php?id=2543

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_House_of_the_Rising_Sun

http://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/RL250.html


In February or March 1925 William S Burroughs send a song, he had learned from a "southerner", to Robert Winslow Gordon, who included it in a 1925 edition of his Adventure magazine column "Old Songs That Men Have Sung". The lyrics are almost identical to the lyrics of the 1964 Animals hit version. Except for the fact that in the course of time the "rounder" became a "rambler" and finally a "gambler".

Image and video hosting by TinyPic


The oldest known existing recording of the song is by Appalachian artists Clarence Ashley and Gwen Foster and was made in 1933.
Ashley said he had learned it from his grandfather, Enoch Ashley.

Ashley & Foster: Gwen Foster, h/g; Thomas C. Ashley, g/v.
Recorded in New York, September 6, 1933
Matrix 13960-1
Released on Vocalion 02576

Image and video hosting by TinyPic


http://www.discogs.com/Ashley-And-Foster-Rising-Sun-Blues/release/7030977

Listen here:





In 1935 Homer Callahan (a member of the Callahan Brothers) recorded "Rounder's Luck" as a solo-effort.
Calling the song “Rounder's Luck” wasn't the Callahans' idea. Homer doesn't remember its original title; though he ended up calling it “House of the Rising Sun" himself, he's not sure if he picked that up after it became popular. As for “Rounder's Luck,” says Callahan, “I have no idea why. I didn't like that title too much. But they didn't ask me.” Callahan figures the longer title wouldn't do commercially. In that context, he says, house was a loaded term that implied the word whore preceded it. This was, remember, the year that Hollywood began enforcing the Hays Code, making movies far tamer than they had been. The two other known versions recorded commercially in the 1930s—by Ashley & Foster and Roy Acuff—reinforce this theory. They were called, respectively, “The Rising Sun Blues” and “Rising Sun” on their labels.


(c) Homer Callahan, v/y; acc. own g;
Recorded in New York, April 11, 1935
Matrix 17289-2
Released on Perfect 6-02-59

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Listen here:





The song might have been lost to obscurity had it not been collected by folklorist Alan Lomax, who, along with his father, was a curator of the Archive of American Folk Song for the Library of Congress. On an expedition with his wife to eastern Kentucky, Lomax set up his recording equipment in Middlesborough, Kentucky in the house of a singer and activist called Tilman Cadle.
On September 15, 1937 he recorded a performance by Georgia Turner, the 16 year-old daughter of a local miner. He called it "The Rising Sun Blues".

(c) Georgia Turner (1937)   (as "Rising Sun Blues")

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

http://www.loc.gov/item/afc9999005.4460

Listen here:





Lomax later recorded a different version sung by Bert Martin and a third sung by Daw Henson, both eastern Kentucky singers.

(c) Bert Martin (October 1937)  (as "Rising Sun Blues")

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

http://www.loc.gov/item/afc9999005.4167

(c) Daw Henson (October 1937)  (as "Rising Sun Blues")

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

http://lcweb2.loc.gov/diglib/ihas/loc.afc.afc9999005.6443/default.html


In his 1941 songbook Our Singing Country, Lomax credits the lyrics to Turner, with reference to Martin's version. According to his later writing, the melody bears similarities to the traditional English ballad "Matty Groves.". To me that's also only a theory.

SEE MY BLOG: http://jopiepopie.blogspot.nl/search/label/Little%20Mattie%20Groves%20%281941%29

A page from "Our Singing Country" (1941)
Image and video hosting by TinyPic Image and video hosting by TinyPic

http://www.traditionalmusic.co.uk/our-singing-country/our-singing-country%20-%200468.htm



Roy Acuff, who recorded the song on November 3, 1938, may have learned the song from Clarence Ashley, with whom he once worked on his medicine shows.

(c) Roy Acuff & His Smoky Mountain Boys (1938) (as "The Risng Sun")
Roy Acuff, v; Clell Summey, sg; Jess Easterday, g/sb; Red Jones, g/sb; Bob Wright, g.
Recorded November 3, 1938 in Columbia, SC.
Released on Vocalion/Okeh 04909

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Listen here:





Sometime between 1941 and 1942 Josh White was the first artist to record a version with the more common title "House Of The Rising Sun".

http://www.jazzdisco.org/mercury-records/keynote-records-catalog-78rpm-500-600-1300-100-series/

It was released on the Keynote-label (#K542) as part of the 3 part 78 RPM album "Strange Fruit".

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Listen here:





Lonnie Donegan, who launched the British skiffle craze in the 1950s - which was the sound of the early Beatles, said in a 1999 interview with Jennifer Rodger of The Independent, "Josh White's 'House of the Rising Sun' inspired me to go into music. This was the first American folk song I heard and the experience kicked off my career, started me singing American blues and folk. I believe Josh started the British rock scene."

Libby Holman, with guitar accompaniment by Josh White, also  recorded a version with the familiar title "House Of The Rising Sun".
Libby and George recorded their version in New York on March 23, 1942.
It was released on the Decca-label (# 18306) and was part of the 3 part 78 RPM album "Blues Till Dawn"

http://www.discogs.com/Libby-Holman-Accompanied-By-Josh-White-Blues-Till-Dawn/release/4672209

Listen here:





On July 7, 1941 the Almanac Singers also recorded a version with the common title: "House of the Rising Sun" at Reeves Sound Studios, New York, NY. Producer: Alan Lomax.

Almanac Singers:
WOODY GUTHRIE, harmonica/leadvocal; PETER HAWES, guitar; PETE SEEGER, banjo.

It was released as record # 5020B on the General-label as a three 78 rpm record set titled "SOD-BUSTER BALLADS"  (General Album G-21)

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

http://web.archive.org/web/20091020182243/http://geocities.com/Nashville/3448/g21.html

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

http://www.45worlds.com/78rpm/record/5020

Listen here:





(c) Leadbelly (1944) (as "In New Orleans")  / (1948) (as "House Of The Rising Sun")

 Lead Belly recorded two versions of the song in February 1944 and in October 1948, called 1. "In New Orleans" and 2. "The House of the Rising Sun" respectively.

1. "In New Orleans" was on the B-side of  "(Black Gal) Where Did You Sleep Last Night".

Recorded in New York City, February 17, 1944
Released in 1944 on Musicraft 312,

Re-released in 1954 on Allegro Elite 4027:

http://www.rootsvinylguide.com/ebay_items/leadbelly-s-sinful-songs-allegro-elite-4027-10-33rpm-lp-1954-issue-vg-vg

And also on Royale 18131:

http://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/MTI2MFgxNjAw/z/Q40AAMXQ1ZhTfmAe/$_57.JPG

The melody on this version is a little bit different from the common version.

Listen here:

http://incoming.jazz-on-line.com/a/mp3c/MUS5132.mp3

2. "The House Of The Rising Sun" was on the Folkways album "The Last Sessions Vol 2"

Recorded in New York City, october 1948.
Released in 1953 on the Folkways-label (FP 242)

http://www.discogs.com/Leadbelly-Leadbellys-Last-Sessions-Volume-Two/release/2877269

Listen here:





On April 25, 1944 (Matrix MA96)  Woody Guthrie recorded "House of the Rising Sun" again. This time it was a solo effort for Moses Asch in New York City.
It was finally released in 1962 on the Folkways album "Woody Guthrie sings Folk Songs" (Folkways FA 2483), maybe as an answer to Bob Dylan's 1962 debut-album which contained "House of the Rising Sun".

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Listen here:



On May 19, 1944 Woody made yet another recording of "House Of The Rising Sun" (MA107).



(c) Hally Wood (1953)
Hally Wood had got it from the Alan Lomax field recording by Georgia Turner.
Released in November 1953 on the album "O' Lovely Appearance of Death" (Elektra EKL-10)
Production: Jac Holzman and Kenneth S Goldstein.
10-inch LP. Credited to the Elektra-Stratford Record Corp.
Lawless lists this as being titled 'American Folksongs of Sadness and Melancholy', which is the title on the label but the subtitle on the sleeve.

http://www.atsf.co.uk/elektra/discography.php?from=10&to=340

http://rateyourmusic.com/release/album/hally_wood/o_lovely_appearance_of_death/

Listen here:





(c) Pete Seeger (1958)  (as "House Of The Rising Sun")
Released on the album "American Favorite Ballads Vol 2" (Folkways FA 2321)

http://www.discogs.com/Pete-Seeger-American-Favorite-Ballads-Volume-2/release/6689160

Seeger probably was the first one to sing about a gambler instead of a rounder or rambler.






(c) Lonnie Donegan (1959)

http://www.discogs.com/Lonnie-Donegan-And-His-Skiffle-Group-Lonnie-Rides-Again/master/694405

Listen here:

https://ia800308.us.archive.org/22/items/LonnieDonegan-TheHouseOfTheRisingSun/LonnieDonegan-TheHouseOfTheRisingSun.mp3



In 1960 Miriam Makeba recorded the song on her eponymous RCA album.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miriam_Makeba_(album)

http://www.discogs.com/Miriam-Makeba-Miriam-Makeba/master/175786

Listen here:





(c) Joan Baez (1960)
Joan Baez recorded the song on her debut-album

http://www.discogs.com/Joan-Baez-Joan-Baez/release/683646

Listen here:





(c) Bob Dylan (1962)
In late 1961, Bob Dylan recorded the song for his eponymous debut album released in March 1962. There is no songwriting credit, but the liner notes indicate that Dylan learned his version of the song from Dave Van Ronk. Literally it says: "House of the Risin' Sun" is a traditional lament of a New Orleans woman driven into prostitution by poverty. Dylan learned the song from the singing of Dave Van Ronk: "I'd always known 'Risin' Sun' but never really knew I knew it until I heard Dave sing it."

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Listen here:




In an interview on the documentary "No Direction Home", Van Ronk said that he was intending to record the song, and that Dylan copied his version. He recorded it soon thereafter on "Just Dave Van Ronk".
"I had learned it sometime in the 1950s, from a recording by Hally Wood, the Texas singer and collector, who had got it from an Alan Lomax field recording by a Kentucky woman named Georgia Turner. I put a different spin on it by altering the chords and using a bass line that descended in half steps—a common enough progression in jazz, but unusual among folksingers. By the early 1960s, the song had become one of my signature pieces, and I could hardly get off the stage without doing it".
(Dave Van Ronk)

Listen here:





An interview with Eric Burdon revealed that he first heard the song back in 1959 in a club in Newcastle, England, where it was sung by a Northumbrian folk singer called Johnny Handle .
Eric Burdon also said once that the Animals heard Josh White perform the song in Europe and decided to cover it.
The Animals were on tour with Chuck Berry and chose it because they wanted something distinctive to sing.
This interview denies assertions that the inspiration for their arrangement came from Bob Dylan. The band enjoyed a huge hit with the song, much to Dylan's chagrin when his version was referred to as a cover—the irony of which was not lost on Van Ronk, who went on record as saying that the whole issue was a "tempest in a teapot", and that Dylan stopped playing the song after The Animals' hit because fans accused Dylan of plagiarism. Dylan has said he first heard The Animals' version on his car radio and "jumped out of his car seat" because he liked it so much.
So in December of 1964 Dylan's producer, Tom Wilson, took an alternate take of Dylan's own original 1961 recording session of "Rising Sun" and overdubbed an electric studio band onto it, later included on the Highway 61 Interactive CD-ROM (released in 1995).

Listen here:





So it's a bit unclear where The Animals inspiration came from. 3 possible sources are mentioned: Johnny Handle , Josh White and Bob Dylan.
But in my opinion a 4th source is possible too.
In April 1961 (so even before Dylan's version) Nina Simone recorded a live-version in New York at the Village Gate (the Animals had recorded 2 other songs that were recorded by Nina Simone before: "Don't let me be misunderstood" and "I put a spell on you").

The Nina Simone Database - LP At the Village Gate

The Nina Simone Database - House of the Rising Sun

Listen here:




And here's the version that made the song world famous in 1964: The Animals hit the Top of the Charts in the UK and then the USA.
The arranging credit went only to Alan Price. According to Burdon, this was simply because there was insufficient room to name all five band members on the record label, and Alan Price's name was first alphabetically. However, this meant that only Price received songwriter's royalties for the hit, a fact that has caused bitterness ever since, especially with Hilton Valentine, who was responsible for the famous electric guitar A minor chord arpeggio, which starts "House of the Rising Sun".

Listen here:





Released in October in 1964, Johnny Hallyday's version "Le Pénitencier" was a French #1 Hit

http://www.45cat.com/record/434955be

Listen here to Johnny:




Even the Beatles sang it at the Let It Be sessions on January 9, 1969.

Get Back/Let It Be sessions: complete song list | The Beatles Bible

Listen here:




Wyclef Jean used the melody (especially the organ-part) of HOTRS in "Sang Fezi" (1997)

Listen here:






Many many more versions of HOTRS are here:  http://secondhandsongs.com/performance/6488/versions#nav-entity




Alger "Texas" Alexander's "The Risin' Sun" recorded in 1928, is sometimes mentioned as the first recording, but is a completely different song.

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Listen here:

http://www.redhotjazz.com/talexander.html



And in 1927 Iva Smith recorded "Rising Sun Blues", which is also a different song

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Listen here:





Also different versions are
Darby and Tarlton's "Rising Sun Blues" (1930) (on the Columbia-label) and
King David's Jug Band's "Rising Sun Blues" (1930) (on the Okeh-label).




vrijdag 21 augustus 2015

Lonesome Road Blues (1924) / Worried Blues (1924) / Goin' Down The Road Feelin' Bad (1924) / Blowin' Down This Road (1940) / Chilly Winds (1957)


Going Down The Road Feelin' Bad, also known as the Lonesome Road Blues, is an American traditional song, "a white blues of universal appeal and uncertain origin" (Ralph Rinzler, quoted on Erbsen 2003, p. 118).
It was recorded by many artists through the years; the first known is Henry Whitter in 1924 as "Lonesome Road Blues". Others who made cover versions include Samantha Bumgarner (as "Worried Blues"), Cliff Carlisle (as "Down In The Jail On My Knees"), Woody Guthrie (also as "Blowin' Down This Road" or "I Ain't Gonna Be Treated This Way"), Bill Monroe, Earl Scruggs, Roy Hall, Elizabeth Cotten and the Grateful Dead.

http://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/LxU072.html

http://www.bluegrassmessengers.com/lonesome-road-blues-henry-whitter.aspx

http://tunearch.org/wiki/Annotation:Going_Down_the_Road_Feeling_Bad

http://www.originals.be/en/originals.php?id=9213


The song turns up on page 242 of the 1947 book Folk Song U.S.A. by John A. Lomax and Alan Lomax, edited by son Alan. It is in the key of D and the tempo is described as "moderately fast." Here are all the verses from that version: Goin' Down the Road Feelin' Bad

I'm goin' down this road feelin' bad,
Lord, I'm goin' down this road feelin' bad,
Well, I'm goin' down this road feelin' bad, Lord, Lord,
An' I ain't gonna be treated thisaway.

I ain't got but one old lousy dime,
Lord, I ain't got but one old lousy dime,
Well, I ain't got but one old lousy dime, Lord, Lord,
But I'll find me a new dollar some old day.

A two dollar shoe won't fit my feet,
Lord, a two dollar shoe won't fit my feet,
Well, a two dollar shoe won't fit my feet, Lord, Lord,
'Cause I ain't gonna be treated thisaway.

Takes a ten dollar shoe to fit my feet,
Lord, takes a ten dollar shoe to fit my feet,
Well, takes a ten dollar shoe to fit my feet, Lord, Lord,
'Cause I ain't gonna be treated thisaway.

I'm goin' where the climate suits my clothes,
Lord, I'm goin' where the climate suits my clothes,
Well, I'm goin' where the climate suits my clothes, Lord, Lord,
'Cause I ain't gonna be treated thisaway.

I'm goin' where the water tastes like wine,
Lord, I'm goin' where the water tastes like wine,
Well, I'm goin' where the water tastes like wine, Lord, Lord,
'Cause this water round here tastes like turpentine.

I'm tired of lyin' in this jail,
Lord, I'm tired of lyin' in this jail,
Well, I'm tired of lyin' in this jail, Lord, Lord,
An' I ain't gonna be treated thisaway.

Yes, they feed me on cornbread and beans,
Lord, they feed me on cornbread and beans,
Well, they feed me on cornbread and beans, Lord, Lord,
And I ain't gonna be treated thisaway

Who'll stir your gravy when I'm gone?
Lord, who'll stir your gravy when I'm gone?
Well, who'll stir your gravy when I'm gone? Lord, Lord,
When I'm gone to my long, lonesome home

Also included in the Frank C Brown Collection vol 5 (song # 441 on page 297)

Image and video hosting by TinyPic


First recorded by Henry Whitter on December 10, 1923
Released on Okeh 40015.

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Lyrics

Oh I’m goin’ down this road feelin’ bad
Oh I’m goin’ down this road feelin’ bad
Oh I’m goin’ down this road feelin’ bad
And I ain’t gonna be treated this a-way

Oh I’m goin’ where the chilly wind never blows
Oh I’m goin’ where the chilly wind never blows
Oh I’m goin’ where the chilly wind never blows
And I ain’t gonna be treated this a-way.

Oh (I’m) way down in jail on my knees,
Oh way down in jail on my knees,
Oh way down in jail on my knees,
And I ain’t gonna be treated this a-way.

Oh they feed me on cornbread and peas
Oh, they feed me on cornbread and peas
Oh, they feed me on cornbread and peas
I ain’t gonna be treated this a-way.

Yes, I’m goin’ where the climate suits my clothes,
Oh I’m goin’ where the climate suits my clothes,
Oh I’m goin’ where the climate suits my clothes,
I ain’t gonna be treated this a-way

Yes I’m goin’ if I never come back,
Oh I’m goin’ if I never come back,
Oh I’m goin’ if I never come back,
And I ain’t gonna be treated this a-way.

Listen here:






 (c) James Barton (1924)  (as "I'm Going Where The Climate Fits My Clothes")
Recorded May 1, 1924 in New York
Released on Okeh 40136.

http://honkingduck.com/discography/artist/james_barton



(c) Henry Whitter (1924)  ( as "Goin' Down The Road Feelin' Bad")
On July 16, 1924 Henry Whitter was also the first one to record the song with the more familiar title "Goin' Down The Road Feelin' Bad"
Released on the Okeh-label (#40169)

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Lyrics

Oh I’m goin’ down this road I'm feelin’ bad
Oh I’m goin’ down this road I'm feelin’ bad
Oh I’m goin’ down this road I'm feelin’ bad
And I ain’t gonna be treated this a-way

Oh it's one dollar won't buy me no shoes
Oh it's one dollar won't buy me no shoes
Oh it's one dollar won't buy me no shoes
And I ain’t gonna be treated this a-way

Oh a two dollar shoe hurt my feet
Oh a two dollar shoe hurt my feet
Oh a two dollar shoe hurt my feet
And I ain’t gonna be treated this a-way

Yes some five dollar shoe fits on me
Your five dollar shoe fits on me
Oh a five dollar shoe fits on me
And I ain’t gonna be treated this a-way

Oh and snap out your finger get your load
Oh and snap out your finger get your load
Oh and snap out your finger get your load
And I ain’t gonna be treated this a-way

 ( I couldn't figure out the sixth verse. Anyone ?)


Oh I’m goin’ down this road I'm feelin’ bad
Oh I’m goin’ down this road I'm feelin’ bad
Oh I’m goin’ down this road I'm feelin’ bad
And I ain’t gonna be treated this a-way

 ( I couldn't figure out the eigth verse either. Anyone ?)


Oh it's mama said i can't live with you
Oh it's mama said i can't live with you
Oh it's mama said i can't live with you
And I think by myself for the way you do

Listen here:






"Worried Blues" is a song that is very closely connected to "Lonesome Road Blues" / "Going Down The Road Feeling Bad".

http://www.originals.be/en/originals.php?id=7072

Samantha Bumgarner was the first one to record the variation with this title:

(o) Samantha Bumgarner (1924) (as "Worried Blues")

Recorded April 23, 1924 in New York, NY;
Samantha Bumgarner, voc, bj
Released on Columbia 166-D

Image and video hosting by TinyPic


http://www.discogs.com/Samantha-Bumgarner-The-Worried-Blues-Georgia-Blues/release/7180983

http://adp.library.ucsb.edu/index.php/matrix/detail/2000029484/81718-The_worried_blues

http://www.wirz.de/music/bumgafrm.htm

Lyrics:

Got the worried blues (x3)
Can't be worried this a-way.

See you when your troubles are like mine (x3)
See you when you can't change a dime

Got the worried blues (x3)
Can't be worried this a-way

Bound down in the jail (x3)
No one to go my bail 

Honey babe would you [or "won't you"] go my bail (x3)
Can't be worried this a-way 

Goin' down this long lonesome road (x3)
Can't be worried this a-way 

Honey babe, don't leave me here (x3)
Unless you leave a dime for beer

Got the worried blues (x3)
Can't be worried this a-way

Goin' down this long lonesome road (x3)
Can't be worried this a-way

Goin' down this long lonesome road (x3)
Can't be worried this a-way

Listen here:





(c) Hill Billies 1926 (as "Goin Down The Road Feeling Bad")
Tony Alderman, f; Fred Roe, f; Charles Bowman, bj; Al Hopkins, p/v; Joe Hopkins, g/v; Henry Roe, g; John Hopkins, u/v.
Recorded on October 23, 1926 in New York, NY
Released on Vocalion 5021

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Lyrics

Goin' down this road feelin' bad,
Oh, goin' down this road feelin' bad,
Oh, goin' down this road feelin' bad, Lord, Lord,
And I ain't gonna be treated this-away

Way down in jail on my knees,
Oh way down in jail on my knees,
Oh way down in jail on my knees, Lord. Lord
And I ain’t gonna be treated this a-way.

Feed me on cornbread and peas
Oh, they feed me on cornbread and peas
Oh, they feed me on cornbread and peas, Lord. Lord
I ain’t gonna be treated this a-way

Mama won't find me no cure ?
Mama won't find me no cure ?
Mama won't find me no cure ? Lord, Lord
And I ain't gonna be treated this-away.

Goin' down this road feelin' bad,
Oh, goin' down this road feelin' bad,
Oh, goin' down this road feelin' bad, Lord, Lord,
And I ain't gonna be treated this-away.

Listen here:





(c) Frank Hutchison (1927)  (as "Worried Blues") the familiar melody, with his own lyrics.

Lyrics are on the next site http://weeniecampbell.com/yabbse/index.php?topic=4210.30

Hutchison recorded the song twice:
once on September 28, 1926, at his first recording session, released on Okeh 45064

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Listen here:



and again on April 29, 1927, released on Okeh 45114

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Listen here:




(c) Riley Puckett (1927)  (as "I'm Going Where The Chilly Winds Don't Blow")
Riley Puckett (solo vcl/gt)
Recorded October, 31 1927 in Atlanta, GA
Released on Columbia 15392-D




(c) Fiddlin John Carson (1929)  (as "You Can't Get Milk From A Cow Named Ben")

Last instrumental part of the song

Released on Okeh 45321

http://www.discogs.com/Fiddlin-John-Carson-And-Moonshine-Kate-You-Cant-Get-Milk-From-A-Cow-Named-Ben-Going-To-The-County-Fa/release/7266310

Listen here:




(c) Fiddlin John Carson and Moonshine Kate (1929)  (as "Down South Where The Sugar Cane Grows")

http://www.discogs.com/Fiddlin-John-Carson-Moonshine-Kate-Hawk-And-Buzzard-Down-South-Where-The-Sugar-Cane-Grows/release/7266437

Released on Okeh 45338

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Lyrics:

Going where the Sugar cane grows
Going where the Sugar cane grows
Going where the Sugar cane grows, Lord, Lord
And I ain't got no trouble at my knees.

Going where the climate suits my clothes
Going where the climate suits my clothes
Going where the climate suits my clothes, Lord, Lord
And I ain't got no trouble at my knees.

Etc, Etc



Listen here:




Fiddlin John Carson with his Virginia Reelers also recorded this song as an instrumental

(c) Fiddlin'  John Carson & His Virginia Reelers (1930)  (as " Goin' Where The Climate Suits My Clothes")
Recorded April 24, 1930
Released on Okeh 45498

Listen here:





In 1931 Sam Collins recorded a song called "Lonesome Road Blues (I'm Goin' Down That Lonesome Road)". This is another song.



(c) Cliff Carlisle 1933 (as "Goin' Down The Road Feelin' Bad")
Recorded July 28, 1933 in New York
Released on various labels such as Conqueror, Panachord and Oriole

http://www.discogs.com/Cliff-Carlisle-Dang-My-Rowdy-Soul-Goin-Down-The-Road-Feelin-Bad/release/7252937

http://www.discogs.com/Cliff-Carlisle-Goin-Down-The-Road-Feelin-Bad-Dang-My-Rowdy-Soul/release/7251358

Listen here:





(c) Riley Puckett 1934 (as "K. C. Railroad")
Recorded March 30, 1934 in San Antonio, Texas
Released on Bluebird 5471 and Montgomery Ward 4508

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

http://www.openmusicarchive.org/projects/index.php?title=Parallel_Anthology_Track_81

http://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/ADR102.html

Listen here:





Additionally, the song "Goin' Down The Road Feelin' Bad" is sung by Eddie Quillan, in his character of Conny Rivers, in a nighttime scene at a labor campin the movie "Grapes Of Wrath"  (1940).

SEE THE SCENE HERE (at 42 min and 57 seconds in the next YT)





(c) Woody Guthrie (1940) (as "Goin’ Down The Road Feelin’ Bad")
Woody Guthrie, vocal and guitar.
Recorded by Alan Lomax at the Department of the Interior radio facility in Washington, D.C., on March 22, 1940.

Woody Guthrie introduced the song this way:


WG: Well, one of the most popular, uh, Alan, was the one that they chose for the Grapes of Wrath picture. “I’m Going Down that Road Feelin’ Bad.” That’s got two or three names. A lot of people call it the “Lonesome Road Blues.” Others call it “Goin’ Down the Road Feelin’ Bad.” It’s got all kinds of names. Anyway, in the picture, they, they sing it pretty classical. I don’t know whether the Okies and the hobos will recognize it or not but then I’m not worried about that because I don’t think that they’ll be spendin’ a quarter to get to see a bunch of grapes or stuff…I don’t know whatever the devil that means, “grapes of wrath.” Here’s the ole song. 
It was wrote, uh, by, uh, a colored slave that run off from his master and went back up North.
He was a Southern slave and he run up North and it was pretty cold up there. So, uh, he worked ‘round up there a little bit and stayed in jails and everythin’ and was treated like a dog, and so awful cold up North and so he wrote this song or got it started:

Listen here:




(c) Woody Guthrie (1940)
In 1940 Woody recorded his own adaptation of the song for the RCA Victor label.
RCA asked Woody to record 12 Dust Bowl Ballads to respond to the enormous success of the Grapes Of Wrath book and film.
Using only guitar and vocals, the album follows the exodus of Midwesterners headed for California and mirrors both Guthrie’s own life and John Steinbeck’s novel The Grapes of Wrath.

Woody Guthrie, v; acc. own h/g.
Recorded in New York, NY on April 26, 1940
Released on Victor 26619

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Also released as part of the Dust Bowl Ballads-album

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dust_Bowl_Ballads

Lyrics are here: http://woodyguthrie.org/Lyrics/Going_Down_The_Road.htm

Listen here:






(c) Almanac Singers (1942)  (as "Goin' Down the Road Feelin' Bad")
Woody Guthrie: harmonica and vocals / Pete Seeger: banjo
January 1942 "Home Disc Recordings" made by the Almanac Singers in New York
Accessioned by the Library Of Congress in February 1942 on glass-base records
Tape copy on LWO 3493 / reel 41A /  Matrix 6105A

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

http://www.loc.gov/item/afc9999005.18229



(c) Weavers (1957)  (as "Goin' Down the Road Feelin' Bad")
Unissued version by the Weavers from the Pete Seeger era.
Finally released in 2003 on the Vanguard album "Rarities From The Vanguard Vault"

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/812ThLXqMZL._SL1086_.jpg

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/81f7%2Bm-D6iL._SL1261_.jpg

Listen here:





(c) Hally Wood (1956)  (as "Worried Blues")
Released on her album "Hally Wood Sings Texas Folk Songs" (Stinson SLP 73)
On the liner-notes of her album, credits go to Samantha Bumgarner (see her 1924 version earlier on in this post)

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Listen here:

https://soundcloud.com/ashes-3/hally-wood-worried-blues



(c) Odetta (1957)  (as "Chilly Winds")

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/At_the_Gate_of_Horn

http://www.discogs.com/Odetta-At-The-Gate-Of-Horn/release/5093814

Listen here:





(c) Elizabeth Cotten (1958) (as "Going Down the Road Feeling Bad")
On the album "Negro Folk Songs and Tunes" (Folkways FG 3526)

http://www.geocities.co.jp/Hollywood/1061/cotten_disco.html#1

Lyrics are here: http://www.geocities.co.jp/Hollywood/1061/lyrics_gdrfb.html

Listen here:





(c) Nina Simone (1959) (as "Chilly Winds Don't Blow")

http://www.boscarol.com/ninasimone/pages/php/show_album.php?id=cp116

Listen here:





(c) Cisco Houston (1960) (as "Chilly Winds")

http://ciscohouston.com/lyrics/chilly_winds.shtml

On the album "Cisco Special" (Vanguard: VRS 9057)

http://ciscohouston.com/LPs/cisco_special.shtml

Listen here:






(c) Jack Burchett (1961)  (as "Chilly winds")
Jack Burchett (vocal and banjo)
Recorded July 1961 in Saltville, Virginia.

Released on the next album:

http://www.folkways.si.edu/doc-watson-and-clarence-ashley/chilly-winds-lonesome-road-blues/american-folk-old-time/music/track/smithsonian

Listen here:






(c) Bob Dylan (1962) (as "Worried Blues")
Recorded Jul 9, 1962 during the Freewheelin' sessions
Released on The Bootleg Series 1-3 (1991)

According to the next site Bob had learned it from Hally Wood, who had learned it from Samantha Bumgarner (according to the liner-notes on her album "Hally Wood Sings Texas Folk Songs" (Stinson SLP 73)

http://www.searchingforagem.com/2010s/2012.htm

http://www.bobdylan.com/us/songs/worried-blues

http://www.interferenza.com/bcs/freew_2.htm

Lyrics

I got those worried blues,
And I got those worried blues,
I got those worried blues,
I got those worried blues,
Lord, I'm a-going where I never been before.

I'm going where the chilly winds don't blow,
I'm going where the chilly winds don't blow,
I'm going where the chilly winds don't blow,
I'm going where the chilly winds don't blow,
I'm going where the climate suits my clothes.

Honey babe don't leave me now,
Honey babe don't leave me now,
Oh honey babe don't leave me now,
Honey babe don't leave me now.
I got trouble in my mind.

Listen to that cold whistle blow,
Lord listen to that cold whistle blow,
Listen to that cold whistle blow,
Listen to that cold whistle blow,
I'm going where I'm never been before.

So I got those worries blues, lord,
I got the worried blues,
I got the worried blues,
And I got the worried blues.
I'm a-going where I never been before.

Listen here:






It is also one of the Dylan/Band Basement Tapes songs - (as "Going Down the Road Feeling Bad" or "No Shoes On My Feet")..

http://iml.jou.ufl.edu/projects/spring01/blake/basement.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Basement_Tapes_songs

Listen here:

http://iml.jou.ufl.edu/projects/spring01/blake/Bob%20Dylan%20-%20Genuine%20Basement%20Tapes%20Vol.5%20-%2012%20-%20No%20Shoes.MP3



The song was part of a medley on the 1970 Delaney & Bonnie album "To Bonnie From Delaney"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/To_Bonnie_from_Delaney




The track also appears on the 1971 Delaney & Bonnie album Motel Shot 





This song became a concert staple for the Grateful Dead, and Jerry Garcia related that he picked it up from Delaney Bramlett of Delaney and Bonnie during the Dead’s trans-Canada rock ‘n’ roll train trip in 1970, beautifully captured in the "Festival Express" movie.

http://www.discogs.com/Various-Festival-Express-/release/7134789

http://theband.hiof.no/films/festival_express.html

 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Festival_Express

Garcia and Bramlett can be seen jamming on the tune, with Janis Joplin singing along with Bramlett, in the movie Festival Express (click on the blue link and the song opens on the Web-site).



Subsequently the song appeared on Grateful Dead’s so-called “Skull & Roses” album, ( the 1971 live double LP "Grateful Dead".)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grateful_Dead_(album)

http://www.whitegum.com/introjs.htm?/songfile/GOINGDOW.HTM

http://www.deaddisc.com/songs/Goin_Down_The_Road_Feeling_Bad.htm

http://taco.com/roots/songs_part2.html

Listen here:



Grateful Dead's version may also be influenced by Woody Guthrie, as well as other renditions by Bill Monroe (1960), Elizabeth Cotton (1958), and Cliff Carlisle (1933).



(c) Bruce Springsteen (as "Blowin' Down The Road")

In 1993 and 1996 Bruce Sprigsteen sang the Woody Guthrie-adaptation of the song on a few gigs

http://www.brucespringsteen.it/DB/sd3.aspx?sid=70

Listen here:




(c) U2 (2011)   (as "Worried Blues")

And in May 2011 U2 sang it on a few gigs.

http://bootlegpedia.com/en/song/Worried_Blues



(c) John Mayer (2013)  (as "Going Down The Road Feeling Bad")

And in 2013 John Mayer sang it live in the David Letterman Show. His version was inspired by the version of the Grateful Dead.
Plans even are John Mayer might join the remaining Dead members on a Halloween-show at New York's Madison Square Garden. For the occasion the bandname will be dubbed Dead & Company.

http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/grateful-dead-members-john-mayer-form-dead-company-20150805





The tune was also used in other traditional songs:

-"New River Train" also recorded by Henry Whitter in 1924

http://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/AF073.html

http://secondhandsongs.com/work/126037

-"I Wish I Was A Mole In The Ground" first recorded by Bascom Lamar Lunsford in 1924

http://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/BAF900.html



-"Roll On Buddy" recorded by Charlie Bowman 1928 (besides the tune there are floating lyrics from "I Wish I Was A Mole In The Ground")

http://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/RcROBRO2.html



-"My Last Gold Dollar" - Bascom Lamar Lunsford (who had learned it from Samantha Bumgarner and Moonshine Kate)

http://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/R671.html