donderdag 19 september 2013

Bumble Bee (Blues) 1929 / Sugar Man (Mama) Blues 1930 / Honey Bee Blues 1931 / New Sugar Mama (1940) / Sugaree / Sugar Bee


I was looking for the ORIGINS of both "Sugar Bee" and "Sugaree" and came across a surprise.

"Sugaree" was recorded in 1951 by a certain Mr Ed Harris with his nom de plume Lazy Slim Jim.


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Could this be a possible precursor of "Sugaree" (Marty Robbins) and maybe even "Sugar Bee" (Eddie Shuler)  ????

If we compare Rusty York's version of "Sugaree" (1959) with Cleveland Crochet's "Sugar Bee" (1960), my conclusion is that Eddie Shuler must have had "Sugaree" in his mind while composing "Sugar Bee".









Lazy Slim Jim's "Sugaree" (1951) sounds a bit like a slow version of Eddie Shuler's "Sugaree".

Listen here to Lazy Slim Jim's "Sugaree":





Lazy Slim Jim's "Sugaree" is loosely related to Lightnin Hopkins's "Sugar Mama" (1948), which itself derives from Sonny Boy Williamson's "Sugar Mama Blues" (1937), probably via Tommy McClennan's "New Sugar Mama" (1940)

But even before Sonny Boy Williamson "Sugar Mama Blues" had been recorded some 3 years earlier by Tampa Red.

And the source goes back even further. Again 3 years before Tampa Red there was a version by St Louis Bessie called "Sugar Man Blues"

All the "Sugar Mama" versions I have mentioned above begin with "Sugar woman sugar woman, please come back to me" except St Louis Bessie's version, which of course begins with "Sugar man sugar man, please come back to me".

But that is still not the end (or rather the beginning) of the story. The story begins with a song I found, which is in the same vein as "Sugar (Wo)man Blues":
In 1929 Kansas Joe and Memphis Minnie recorded "Bumble Bee (Blues)".
Although with rather different and risque lyrics the musical setting is almost the same and it also begins with: "Bumble bee bumble bee won't you please come back to me".

To underline this proposition: In 1952 John Lee Hooker has recorded both "Bumble Bee Blues" and "Sugar Mama Blues". Because of the risque lyrics he recorded the first one with his nom de plume "Johnny Williams".
"Sugar Mama Blues" (with the less risky lyrics) was released under his own name.


In the story below I have also added versions of "Sugar Mama Blues" which begin with a different initial line: "Sugar mama, sugar mama, where did you get yo' sugar from?".
The first one with that different starting line, could be Peetie Wheatstraw's 1938 version. And he was the pianist on St Louis Bessie's 1930 version of "Sugar Man Blues.
But country bluesman Yank Rachell already recorded a song called "Sugar Farm Blues" on February 6, 1934 (Melotone M12958, listed as "Poor Jim with Dan Jackson"). This version is in the same vein and must be the first one using the line "where did you get your sugar from".
This version was used in most cover-versions of the song from the 1960's on.
Big Joe Williams 1961 song "Sugar Babe" is also a variant of the "Sugar Man where did you get your sugar from" branch.


Well here's the audiovisual history of  "Bumble Bee" / Sugar Mama" / "Sugar Bee" :

(o) Kansas Joe & Memphis Minnie 1929 (Bumble Bee)
Kansas Joe (guitar) & Memphis Minnie (vocal & guitar)
Recorded June 18, 1929 in New York City.
Released on Columbia 14542-D

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Listen here:




LYRICS:
Bumble bee, bumble bee, please come back to me 2x
He got the best old stinger any bumble bee that I ever seen

He stung me this morning, I been looking for him all day long 2x
Lord, it got me to the place, hate to see my bumble bee leave home

Bumble bee, bumble bee, don't be gone so long 2x
You's my bumble bee and you're needed here at home

I can't stand to hear him buzz, buzz, buzz
Come in, bumble bee, want you to stop your fuss
You're my bumble bee and you know your stuff
Oh, sting me, bumble bee, until I get enough

Bumble bee, bumble bee, don't be gone so long 2x
You's my bumble bee and you're needed here at home

I don't mind you going, ain't going to stay so long
Don't mind you going, don't be gone so long
You's my bumble bee and you're needed here at home

I can't stand to hear him buzz, buzz, buzz
Come in, bumble bee, I want you to stop your fuss
You's my bumble bee and you know your stuff
Oh, sting me bumble bee, until I get enough

http://blueslyrics.tripod.com/artistswithsongs/memphis_minnie_1.htm#bumble_bee_columbia_version




(c) Memphis Minnie 1930 (Bumble Bee)
Memphis Minnie (vocal & guitar) & Kansas Joe (guitar)
Recorded February 21, 1930 in Memphis, TN.
Released on Vocalion 1476 and Banner 32525

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Listen here:




LYRICS:

http://blueslyrics.tripod.com/artistswithsongs/memphis_minnie_1.htm#bumble_bee_vocalion_version



(c) Memphis Jug Band 1930 (Bumble Bee Blues)
Memphis Jug Band (Charlie Burse (g), Will Shade (h), Hambone Lewis (j))
& Memphis Minnie (guitar & vocals)
Recorded May, 26 1930 in Memphis TN.
Released on Victor V 38599

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(c) St Louis Bessie 1930 (Sugar Man Blues (part 1 and 2)
St Louis Bessie (& Charley Jordan (guitar) & Peetie Wheatstraw (piano)
Recorded in Chicago, Illinois, September 19, 1930 on Vocalion 1559

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LYRICS:
Sugar man sugar man, please come back to me (2x)
You don't know how I love you and I cannot let you be

Love you sweet man, do anything you say (2x)
Sweet daddy sweet daddy don't treat me this-a way

You got that sweet kind of sugar, make a good woman lose her mind (2x)
If you take me back sweet daddy I'll treat you so nice and kind

I'm so wild about your sugar, don't know what to do (2x)
It's that granulated sugar ain't nobody got but you

My coffee must be sugared in the morning, my tea late at night (2x)
When I don't get my sugar, baby I don't feel just right

If you see my sugar, tell him I say Hurry home
See my sugar, tell him I say Hurry home
I had nothin' sweet since my sugar been gone

Part II:

Sugar man sugar man, you got the best sugar in town (2x)
Please don't let some other woman tear your sugar down

Every time you leave me, I hand my head and cry (2x)
If you don't want me buddy please tell me the reason why

Blues falling down on me, just like drops of rain (2x)
Sugar lovin' sugar to another woman and don't give me a grain

I'm gon' tell you somethin' baby, want you to keep it to yourself (2x)
If you don't give me all of your sugar you won't give it to no one else

Mmmmm... want my sugar right now (2x)
Lord I want my sugar, got to have my sugar now

http://www.lyricsforsong.net/lyrics/st-louis-bessie-sugar-man-blues-lyrics_jojjni.html



(c) Bumble Bee Slim 1931 (Honey Bee Blues)
Bumble Bee Slim (=Amos Easton) (vocals and guitar)
Recorded October 1931 in Grafton, WI
Released on Paramount 13132

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(c) Yank Rachell recorded "Sugar Farm Blues" with Dan Smith on February 6, 1934
Released on Melotone M12958, listed as "Poor Jim with Dan Jackson").
This version is probably the first one using the line "where did you get your sugar from"

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Listen here:





(c) Tampa Red 1934 (Sugar Mama Blues No 1)
Tampa Red (vocals and guitar)
Recorded March 23, 1934, Chicago, IL.
Released as Vocalion 02720, Conqueror 8862.

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Listen here:



LYRICS: http://www.maxilyrics.com/tampa-red-sugar-mama-blues-no.-1-lyrics-47b5.html




(c) Sonny Boy Williamson 1937 (Sugar Mama Blues)
John Lee "Sonny Boy"Williamson (& Joe Williams & Robert Lee McCoy (guitar)
Recorded May 5, 1937, Leland Hotel, Aurora, Ill.
Released on the B-side of his classic "Good Morning School Girl" (Bluebird B 7059)

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Listen here:



LYRICS:
Sugar mama, sugar mama, sugar mama please come back to me
Sugar mama, sugar mama, sugar mama please come back to me
Bring me my granulated sugar1, sugar mama, and try to ease my misery

You've got this new grade of sugar, sugar mama, an you done made me love it too
You've got this new grade of sugar, sugar mama, an you done made me love it too
You've got this granulated sugar, sugar mama, ain't nobody else got, but you

They been braggin' 'bout your sugar, sugar mama, been braggin' all over town
They been braggin' 'bout your sugar, sugar mama, braggin' all over town
Now, the bootleggers2 want you to sell 'em enough to make whiskey,
but you won't sell 'em about four or five pounds

I like my coffee sweet in the mornin', you know, an I'm crazy 'bout my tea at night
I like my coffee sweet in the mornin', you know, an I'm crazy 'bout my tea at night
Don't get my sugar three times a day, oh, Lord, then I don't feel right

http://www.metrolyrics.com/sugar-mama-lyrics-sonny-boy-williamson-i.html



(c) Peetie Wheatstraw 1938 (Sugar Mama)
Peetie Wheatstraw (=William Buch) (v,p), Lonnie Johnson (g), unknown (d)
Recorded October 18, 1938 in Chicago IL -
Matrix 91529-A
Released on Decca 7529

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Listen here:



http://www.allmusic.com/song/sugar-mama-mt0029564371

LYRICS: http://www.sing365.com/music/lyric.nsf/Sugar-Mama-lyrics-Peetie-Wheatstraw/B795938E99682A844825742500262209




(c) Tommy McClennan 1940 (New Sugar Mama)
Tommy McClennan, voc, g
Recorded December 12, 1940, Chicago., Ill.;
Released on Bluebird B 8760

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Listen here:



LYRICS:
Sugar mama, sugar mama
Won't you please come back to me?
Sugar mama, sugar mama
Won't you please come back to me?
Bring me that grad'ulated sugar
Sugar mama, it'll ease my misery

Now, I want coffee sweet in the mo'nin
You know I"m crazy 'bout that tea at night
Yeah, yeah
I want coffee sweet in the mo'nin
An I"m crazy 'bout my tea at nightI want
Don't get my sugar three time a day
Great Lord, I don't feel right

Now, you been braggin' 'bout your whiskey
Now-now, you been braggin' all ov'r town
You been braggin' 'bout your whiskey
You been braggin', sweet mama, all ov'r town
The bootlegger won't sell enough sugar
To make whiskey
Don't even sell ya but about four or five pounds

Now, sugar mama, sugar mama
Would you please come back to me?
(soon)
Sugar mama, sugar mama
Please come on back to me?
Bring me that grad'ulated sugar
That all it take to ease my misery

Now, sugar mama, sugar mama
You know you been gone all day long
Now, sugar mama, sugar mama
You know you been gone all day long
You been doin' somethin' wit' my sugar
Ooo, Lord and I know it's wrong

Now, sugar mama, sugar mama
Now would you please come on back to me?
Umm-mmm
Please come on back to me
You know, I don't like nothin' but my sugar
And that should take to ease my misery.



(c) Lightnin Hopkins 1948 (Sugar Mama)
Lightnin Hopkins: voc, guitar
Recorded in Houston, February 25, 1948
Released on Aladdin 3015

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Listen here:



http://grooveshark.com/s/Sugar+Mama/3Ud1XK?src=5



(c) Johnny Williams (=John Lee Hooker) 1952 (Bumble Bee Blues)
John Lee Hooker, gtr
Vernon "Boogie Woogie Red" Harrison,pno;
Curtis Foster,dms
Recorded circa 1951
Released 1952 on the B-side of Staff 713

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http://jlhvinyl.com/jacket-label%20pics/staff/78staff718b.jpg

This is John Lee Hooker's "dirty" version





(c) John Lee Hooker 1952 (Sugar Mama)
Chess session, Chicago or Detroit April 24, 1952
Released on Chess 1513

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http://jlhvinyl.com/jacket-label%20pics/chess/78chess1513a.jpg

This is John Lee Hooker's "clean" version.






(c) LIL' SON JACKSON 1955 (Sugar Mama)
Recorded January 1955 in Dallas, Tx.; Melvin Jackson, voc, g
Released on Imperial 5339

Listen here:





(c) Lighnin' Slim 1955 (Sugar Plum)

http://www.discogs.com/Lightnin-Slim-Sugar-Plum-Just-Made-Twenty-One/release/4816594

Listen here:





(c) B.B. King 1959 (Sugar Mama)
B.B. King (v,g), Kenny Sands, Henry Boozier (tp), Lawrence Burdine, Johnny Board, Barry Hubert (s), Millard Lee (p), Marshall York (b), Ted Curry (d)
Recorded 1959 - Los Angeles CA
Released on the B-side of Kent K 329

http://www.45cat.com/record/45x329

Listen here:





(c) Doctor Ross The Harmonica Boss with Tony Valla and The Alamos 1960 (Sugar Mama)

http://www.wirz.de/music/dr_ross/grafik/fort5384.jpg

http://www.706unionavenue.nl/83574033



(c) Big Joe Williams 1961 (Sugar Babe)
Recorded October 7, 1961 in New York
Big Joe Williams: voc, gtr
Larry Johnson: hca
Willie Dixon: b
Released in 1965 on the album "Studio Blues" (Prestige/Bluesville BV 1083)

http://www.jazzdisco.org/prestige-records/catalog-bluesville-1000-series/#bvlp-1083

http://www.popsike.com/pix/20100514/120569486698.jpg

Listen here:





(c) Howlin Wolf 1964 (Sugar Mama)
Recorded July 26, 1963. Live in Chicago at the Copa Cabana Club.
Howlin' Wolf, v, hca; Jarrett Gibson, Donald Hankins, saxes; Otis Spann, p; Buddy Guy, g; Jack Meyers, b; Fred Below, d.
Released 1964 on the album "Folk Festival of the Blues" (ARGO 4031)

Listen here:





(c) Howlin Wolf 1964 (My Country Sugar Mama)
Recorded August 1964 in Chicago, IL;
Howlin' Wolf, voc, # hca; Arnold Rogers, ts; sax; Johnny Jones, p; Hubert Sumlin, g; Andrew Palmer, b; Junior Blackmon, dr
Released on Chess 1911

http://www.45cat.com/record/1911

http://depanorama.net/wolf/wolf2.htm

Listen here:






(c) John Hammond 1968 (Sugar Mama)
Recorded January 30, 1968
Released on the album "Sooner or later" (Atlantic SD 8206)

http://www.discogs.com/John-Hammond-Sooner-Or-Later/release/1686297

Listen here:





(c) Southern Comfort 1968 (Sugar Mama)
Big Walter "Shakey" Horton (Harmonica), Martin Stone (Guitar), Jerome Arnold (bass), Jessie C. Lewis (Drums)
Recorded London, October 1968
Released on the album “Southern Comfort”

http://www.discogs.com/Walter-Shakey-Horton-Martin-Stone-2-Jessie-Lewis-Jerome-Arnold-Southern-Comfort/release/3680439

Listen here:





(c) Cuby & the Blizzards 1968 (Sugar Mama)
Live at the Rheinhalle, Dusseldorf, november 1968
Released on the album "Cuby + Blizzards Live" (Philips PY 844 087)

http://www.discogs.com/Cuby-Blizzards-Live/release/2224142

Listen here:





(c) Taste 1969 (Sugar Mama)
Rory Gallagher: Guitars, Vocals, Saxophone, Harmonica
Richard "Charlie" McCracken: Bass Guitar
John Wilson: Drums
Released April 1969 on the first album of Rory Gallagher's Taste on the Polydor-label (Polydor 583 042)

http://www.discogs.com/Taste-Taste/release/450945

Listen here:





(c) Fleetwood Mac 1969 (Sugar Mama)
Peter Green (Vocal), Peter Green (Guitar), Danny Kirwan (Guitar), John McVie (Bass), Mick Fleetwood (Drums), Otis Spann (Piano)
Recorded at Chess Ter-Mar Studios, Chicago, January 4, 1969
Released December 5, 1969 on album "Blues Jam At Chess" (Blue Horizon 7-6627)

http://www.discogs.com/Fleetwood-Mac-Otis-Spann-Willie-Dixon-Shakey-Horton-JT-Brown-Guitar-Buddy-Honey-Boy-Edwards-SP-Leary/release/2831204

http://discog.fleetwoodmac.net/discog.php?pid=30





More versions here:

http://www.secondhandsongs.com/work/12156




In 1962 label-boss Bobby Robinson wrote an arrangement of "Sugar Mama".
This arrangement "Sugar Babe" was recorded by Buster Brown and released on Robinson's own Fire-label.

http://www.45cat.com/record/nc792655us

Listen here:





This Robinson-arrangement was covered in 1962 by Jimmy Powell

http://www.45cat.com/record/f11447

Listen here:







Finally: I began this post with 3 versions of "Bumble Bee (Blues).
I will end with a few cover-versions at the end of this post.
Listen carefully: or you'll be stung !!!


(c) Big Mama Thornton 1966 (Big Mama's Bumble Bee Blues)
recorded April 25, 1966 at Coast Recorders in San Francisco, CA.
with the Muddy Waters Blues Band ;
Muddy Waters - guitar; Otis Spann - Piano; James Cotton - harmonica; Sammy Lawhorn - guitar; Luther Johnson - bass; Francis Clay - drums

http://www.secondhandsongs.com/release/60907

Listen here:




(c) Papa John Creach 1992 (Bumble Bee)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Papa_Blues

Listen here:




(c) Corey Harris 1997 (Bumble Bee Blues)

Listen to a sample of 1 min 30 sec on the next link

http://www.amoeba.com/music-player.php?type=track&id=11062993



More versions here:

http://www.secondhandsongs.com/performance/162184


zondag 8 september 2013

Bard of Armagh (1920) / Gambler's Blues (1927) / St. James Infirmary (1929)

"St. James Infirmary Blues" or "Gambler's Blues" is based on an 18th-century traditional English folk song called "The Unfortunate Rake" (also known as "The Unfortunate Lad" or "The Young Man Cut Down in His Prime"), about a soldier who uses his money on prostitutes, and then dies of a venereal disease. Variations typically feature a narrator telling the story of a young man "cut down in his prime" (occasionally, a young woman "cut down in her prime") as a result of morally questionable behavior. For example, when the song moved to America, gambling and alcohol became common causes of the youth's death. There are numerous versions of the song throughout the English-speaking world. It evolved into other American standards such as "The Streets of Laredo", which has a different melody

SEE MY BLOG: http://jopiepopie.blogspot.nl/2013/08/cowboys-lament-1927-streets-of-laredo.html

"St. James Infirmary" (aka "The Gambler's Blues") surfaces around 1900. "The Gamblers Blues" appeared in a published collection in 1920 with composer's credits going to E.V. Body (meaning everybody - author unknown).

http://www.ellismillermusic.com/Blog/Genealogy%20Sts%20of%20Laredo.pdf

In her book "On The Trail Of The Negro Folk-Songs" (1925) Dorothy Scarborough wrote down a song with a striking resemblance to "St James Infirmary".
The song "How Sad Was The Death Of My Sweetheart" is on page 94 of that book
 
http://www.archive.org/stream/ontrailofnegrofo00scar#page/94/mode/2up



Already in 1926 Phil Baxter and his Texas Tommies had the song on their repertoire:
Their version "Gambler's Blues" was credited to Phil Baxter and Carl Moore and published in 1925.

http://tinyurl.com/jw6eqat

http://iwentdowntostjamesinfirmary.blogspot.nl/2010/06/phil-baxter-bandleader-co-composer-of.html


Carl Sandburg collected a few versions in his American Songbag (1927):

http://www.archive.org/stream/americansongbag029895mbp#page/n255/mode/2up

http://www.archive.org/stream/americansongbag029895mbp#page/n257/mode/2up




And the first recorded version seems to be:

Stanley “Fess” Williams (v)
accompanied by David “Jelly” James (tb), 2 unknown (as,ts), Otto Mikell (bar), Henry “Hank” Duncan (p), Clinton Walker (bb). One of the saxophonists also plays oboe. vocals FW
New York, February 25, 1927
4. E4599 Gambler’s Blues (Carl Moore-Phil Baxter)
released on Vocalion 1087

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Part of the SJI-tune is quoted clearly in a song called Charleston Cabin (composed by Roy Reber), frequently recorded as an instrumental:
on March 21, 1924 by Whitey Kaufman's Original Pennsylvania Serenaders,
in August 1924 by The Carolina Club Orchestra (with Hal Kemp),
on July 6 1924 by Saxi Holtsworth's Harmony Hounds
and on July 22, 1924 by Ray Miller's Orchestra

http://lfno.blogspot.nl/2006/03/charleston-cabin-fresh-mystery.html

http://tinyurl.com/l4rbmf4

Listen to a version by Whitey Kaufman here:



or here;

http://www.loc.gov/jukebox/recordings/detail/id/9798/

http://www.redhotjazz.com/kaufman.html



And Ray Miller's version is here: (the SJI part starts at 59 seconds)
Recorded July 22, 1924.
Released on Brunswick 2666.

Listen here:





The song is also mentioned in Carl Sandberg's American Songbag (1927) as "Those Gambler's Blues".

http://archive.org/stream/americansongbag029895mbp#page/n255/mode/2up

http://archive.org/stream/americansongbag029895mbp#page/n257/mode/2up





The Irish tune "Bard of Armagh" is also closely associated with the tune of "St James Infirmary"

Already in 1920 John McCorrmack recorded "Bard of Armagh" for the Victor label

Victor matrix B-23792. The bard of Armagh / John McCormack - Discography of American Historical Recordings

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While on most versions, the composer for "St James Infirmary" is listed as Joe Primrose (a pseudonym for Irving Mills), there is no doubt that the Louis Armstrong version was plucked from the tree of "The Unfortunate Rake" folk-song and is a first cousin to "Streets of Laredo".

Before Irving Mills copyrighted the song in 1929, Louis Armstrong had already recorded the song on December 12, 1928 for the Okeh-label (credited to Don Redman !!).
Don Redman played clarinet in the Savoy Ballroom Five. 

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(c) Buell Kazee 1928 (as "Gambling Blues")
Recorded in New York City January 16, 1928
Released on Brunswick 218

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(c) Hokum Boys 1929 (as "Gambler's Blues (St. James Infirmary Blues)")
Recorded October 1929 in Chicago
Released on Paramount 12897

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(c) Hokum Boys 1929 (as "Gambler's Blues no 2)
Recorded October 1929 in Grafton, Wisconsin
Released on Paramount 12919

Listen here:





(c) Kansas City Frank (=Frank Melrose) and his Footwarmers 1929
Recorded November 1929
Released on Paramount 12898
This record was issued on Broadway records as Harry’s Reckless Five.

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http://www.redhotjazz.com/kcffootwarmers.html

Listen here:



or here

http://www.redhotjazz.com/Songs/melrose/stjames.ra



(c) George E. Lee and his Orchestra 1929
Recorded in Kansas City on November 6, 1929
Released on Brunswick 4684

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http://www.redhotjazz.com/lee.html

Listen here:



http://archive.org/download/GeorgeE.LeesNoveltySingingOrch-StJamesInfirmary1929/GeorgeE.LeesNoveltySingingOrch-StJamesInfirmary1929.mp3



(c) Goebel Reeves (The Texas Drifter) (1930) (as "Blue Undertaker's Blues")
Recorded on January 3, 1930
Released on Okeh 45408

Blue Undertaker

Goebel Reeves - When The Clock Struck Seventeen / Blue Undertaker's Blues (Shellac) at Discogs

Listen here:





(c) Rube Bloom and his Bayou Boys 1930
When you consider the lineup, it is kind of a supergroup. Along with Rube on the piano, he engaged Manny Klein on trumpet, Tommy Dorsey on trombone, Benny Goodman on clarinet, Adrian Rollini on bass saxophone, Stan King on drums and vocalist Roy Evans at the microphone.
Recorded January 16, 1930
Released on Columbia 2103-D

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(c) Mattie Hite 1930 (as "St. Joe's Infirmary")
Recorded January 27, 1930 Mattie Hite on the Columbia-label:

Credits on this version go to the above mentioned E.V. Body  (meaning everybody - author unknown).

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(c) King Oliver 1930
Recorded January 28, 1930
Released on Victor 22298

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(c) Gene Austin 1930
Recorded January 28, 1930
Released on Victor 22299

http://www.discogs.com/Gene-Austin-St-James-Infirmary-After-Youve-Gone-/release/4519191

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Listen here:

http://archive.org/download/GeneAustinCollection1925-1934-PartOne/St.JamesInfirmary1930GeneAustin.mp3



(c) Ten Black Berries 1930
Recorded January 29, 1930
Plaza recording session, New York City
This was in fact the Duke Ellington Orchestra
With vocals by Sonny Smith (=composer Irving Mills )

http://ellingtonweb.ca/Hostedpages/DoojiCollection/DoojiCollection-1930.html

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(c) Mills Merry Makers 1930
Mills Merry Makers (created by composer Irving Mills for recording purposes only), with musicians including Charlie and Jack Teagarden, Harry Goodman (brother of Benny), and Ruby Weinstein, recorded a version on January 31, 1930 in New York.
Vocalist Buddy Edwards = Charlie Teagarden.
It was released the Harmony label (#1104) and Velvet Tone label (# 2104)

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(c) Harlem Hot Chocolates 1930
Recorded March 1930
This was in fact the Duke Ellington Orchestra
With vocals by the composer Irving Mills

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(c) Jimmie Rodgers 1930 (as "Those Gamber's Blues")
Recorded in Los Angeles July 5, 1930
Released on Victor 22254

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(c) Emmet Mathews (1931) (as "St. James Infirmary")
Recorded May 1931 in Grafton, Wis.
Released on Paramount 13087

St James Infirmary - Emmet Mathews (1931)

Listen here:




(c) Cab Calloway 1931 (as "St. James Infirmary") (credited to Joe Primrose=Irving Mills)
Recorded in New York on December 23, 1930
Released on Brunswick 6105 and Melotone 7-06-05

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In 1933 Cab Calloway sang "St. James Infirmary" in the Betty Boop cartoon "Snow-White"
Cab sings "St. James Infirmary" in the rotoscoped guise of Koko the Clown.

SEE NEXT YT (after 4 minutes and 20 seconds)



"St. James Infirmary" was Cab's original signature tune, but he wanted something written specifically for himself, so he and Irving Mills wrote "Minnie the Moocher" to supplant "St. James Infirmary" The two melodies are extremely similar.

SEE NEXT YT (after 1 minute and 35 seconds)



Both melodies also bear a close resemblance to "Prohibition Blues" 

Missourians - Prohibitionn Blues (1930)





On November 5, 1940 Blind Willie McTell (under supervision of Alan Lomax) recorded "Dying Crapshooter's Blues", which is also a clear variant of "Gambler's Blues".

Listen here:



McTell's "Dying Crapshooter's Blues" was also the inspiration for Bob Dylan to write "Blind Willie McTell" for the 1983 Infidels-sessions.


But "Dying Crapshooter's Blues" was already recorded 13 years earlier by at least 3 artists.

Essay - Tracing The Origins of Dying Crapshooters Blues  - Chapter I

-Martha Copeland (May 5, 1927 on Columbia 14227-D)
The composer of "Dyin'Crap Shooter's Blues" (Porter Grainger) accompanies Copeland on piano on this recording !!)

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http://www.redhotjazz.com/copeland.html

Listen here:

http://prewarblues.org/files/crapshooter.mp3



-Nannie McKinney (June 24, 1927 , Brunswick unissued)
 Accompanied by the composer of "Dyin' Crap Shooter's Blues" (Porter Grainger)

Nannie McKinney



-Viola McCoy (August 26, 1927 on Cameo 1225,
(as Fannie Johnson on Romeo 453)
(and as Susan Williams on Lincoln 2690)

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http://www.redhotjazz.com/mccoy.html

Listen here:





-Rosa Henderson (September 20, 1927 on Pathe Actuelle 7535 and Perfect 135

http://www.redhotjazz.com/rosahenderson.html

Listen here:






(c) Josh White (1944)  (as "St James Infirmary Blues")
Recorded in 1944
Released on the Asch-label (Asch 358)

St James Infirmary - Josh White (1944)

Josh White - Folk Songs Sung By Josh White (Shellac, Album) at Discogs

Josh White - St. James Infirmary / No. 12 Train (Shellac) at Discogs

Listen here:





(c) Bobby Bland 1961

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Listen here:





(c) Janis Joplin (around 1962)

Listen here:





(c) Johnny Kendall and the Heralds 1964

http://www.discogs.com/Johnny-Kendall-The-Heralds-St-James-Infirmarys-Little-Girl/release/3818428

Listen here:






(c) Eric Burdon & The Animals 1968

http://www.discogs.com/viewimages?release=3631557

Listen here:




(c) Joe Cocker 1972

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And on his album: "Joe Cocker on A&M:

http://www.discogs.com/Joe-Cocker-Joe-Cocker/release/1854707

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(c) Bob Dylan 1983 (as "Blind Willie McTell").

As I said before Blind McTell's "Dying Crapshooter's Blues" was also the inspiration for Bob Dylan to write "Blind Willie McTell" for the 1983 Infidels-sessions.





(c) The Band (1993)  (as "Blind Willie McTell")





(c) White Stripes 1999

On the next album:  http://www.discogs.com/White-Stripes-The-White-Stripes/master/10338

Listen here:





(c) Hugh Laurie 2011

http://www.discogs.com/Hugh-Laurie-Let-Them-Talk/master/335368

Listen here:




And here are more versions:

http://www.secondhandsongs.com/work/7643

http://www.originals.be/en/originals.php?id=5818


donderdag 5 september 2013

She Was Poor But She Was Honest (1930) / Kapitalismen (1960) / De Schuld van het Kapitaal (1967)


"She Was Poor But She Was Honest"  aka "It's The Same The Whole World Over"

According to Ed Cray in the second edition of The Erotic Muse: American Bawdy Songs, "She Was Poor But She Was Honest" was originally "a bathetic lament, sung with tongue in cheek by English music hall singers" and probably dates from the latter half of the 19th Century. There are numerous versions; when it crossed the Atlantic, it was adapted as a jibe at James Folsom.

http://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/EM128.html


It was popular in bawdy versions in the British Army during World War I (1914-1918)

"She Was Poor But She Was Honest" is also known as "It's The Same The Whole World Over" and can be rendered as both a poem and a monologue. The theme is hardly new or entirely fictional, and has undoubtedly inspired many songs both before and since including the tragic "Kitty Jay" which is based on the legend of Jay's Grave.


In 1923 Robert W. Gordon collected a version by E.S. Fowlds, Hidalgo, Mex., 9/17/23
It is song # 246 in The Gordon 'Inferno' Collection Index


This song is also mentioned in Carl Sandburg's "American Songbag" (1927) as "It's The Syme The Whole World Over"

http://www.archive.org/stream/americansongbag029895mbp#page/n227/mode/2up/search/syme


A 1930 version by Bob Weston and Bert Lee was regularly performed by the comic enter­tainer Billy Bennett (1887–1942). The lyric exists in varying forms, and has been lewdly adapted for drinking songs, but the gist is always of a country girl who is seduced and abandoned by a wicked squire. Fleeing to London, she receives similar treatment from gentlemen in positions of authority. Finally she throws herself from a bridge into the Thames at midnight. In one version she drowns but in others she is rescued.




Here's the first recorded version I could find by British comedian Billy Bennett.

(o) Billy Bennett 1930

http://www.mustrad.org.uk/reviews/bennett.htm

Released on Columbia DB 164
Written by R.P. Weston (music) and Bert Lee (lyrics)

https://www.discogs.com/Billy-Bennett-She-Was-Poor-But-She-Was-Honest-Dont-Send-My-Boy-To-Prison/release/7798484

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Listen here:




2 years later Billy recorded another version on the Regal Zonophone-label

(c) Billy Bennett 1932

Released on Regal Zonophone MR 147

https://www.discogs.com/Billy-Bennett-She-Was-Poor-But-She-Was-Honest-Dont-Send-My-Boy-To-Prison/release/7457650

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(c) Cyril Smith (1949 ??)

Released on Castle Records # CA-261

http://archive.org/download/HowFightsStartInSaloonsAndSheWasPoorButSheWasHonest/SheWasPoorButSheWasHonest.mp3




(c) Original Soho Skiffle Group (=Vipers Skiffle Group) 1960 (recorded in 1957)

http://www.discogs.com/Original-Soho-Skiffle-Group-Original-Soho-Skiffle-Group/release/2948348

http://tedschu17.ecrater.com/p/7985015/original-soho-skiffle-group-s-t-mono-1960#

http://www.goldminemag.com/article/footnote-archives-the-vipers-paved-the-way-for-british-pop

Listen to a sample here;

http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B001J6A450



(c) Derek Lamb 1962 (as "She Was Poor But She Was Honest")

Listen to a sample here:

http://www.folkways.si.edu/derek-lamb/she-was-poor-but-she-was-honest-nice-naughty-and-nourishing-songs-of-the-london-music-hall-and-pubs/celtic-world/music/album/smithsonian



(c) Ian Whitcomb 1965 (Poor But Honest)

http://www.discogs.com/Ian-Whitcomb-And-Bluesville-You-Turn-Me-On-Turn-On-Song-Poor-But-Honest/master/517379

Listen here:





The lyrics were also in Sing Out ! magazine : Volume.15 Issue number 4 page 35 (1965)

http://www.singout.org/so-song-index.html

In Danmark and Sweden the song was then very popular in the folk-circuit after Per Dich wrote Danish lyrics for the saong from that Sing Out ! magazine


(c) Per Dich (1966) (as "Kapitalismen")
This is the Danish version by Per Dich who also wrote the Danish lyrics

http://www.discogs.com/Per-Dich-Kapitalismen/release/772661






(c) Fred Åkerström ( as "Kapitalismen")
And this is the Swedish version, with Swedish words by Patrik (=Per-Anders Boquist)

http://www.discogs.com/Fred-%C3%85kerstr%C3%B6m-Dagsedlar-%C3%85t-Kapitalismen/release/3385329






(c) Leen Jongewaard 1967 (as "De Schuld van het Kapitaal")  (Dutch lyrics Michel van der Plas)

http://www.45cat.com/record/333883jf

http://www.discogs.com/Leen-Jongewaard-De-Schuld-Van-Het-Kapitaal/release/1194207

http://www.discogs.com/Leen-Jongewaard-Leen-Al-Leen/release/2810831






dinsdag 3 september 2013

I'll Overcome Some Day (1900) / We Will Overcome (1950) / We Shall Overcome (1952) / I'll Be Alright (1955)



"We Shall Overcome" began as a gospel hymn "I'll Overcome Some Day" or "I'll be Alright" and union song "We Will Overcome", but it was transformed by its four authors into the rallying cry of the black Freedom Movement for civil rights.

http://www.originals.be/nl/originals.php?id=6746

The song is credited, for publishing purposes, to Horton, Carawan, Seeger and Hamilton. This is obviously inaccurate but this credit is particularly important for two reasons: Harold Leventhal, the folk music sage who managed the Weavers and Seeger, knew the song would be claimed by some music industry sharpie if singers involved with the movement didn't step in. Also, the royalties, initially assigned to SNCC, have, since that group's demise, gone to the Highlander Center where they are distributed in small grants for cultural expression to African-American groups working in the South.

In 1945, the words and tune came together in a song called "I'll Overcome Some Day," with additional words by Atron Twigg and a revised musical arrangement by Kenneth Morris, a Chicago gospel singer. Morris' musical arrangement was most likely derived from the 19th Century hymn "I'll Be Alright".
African-Americans on the remote Sea Islands off the coasts of Georgia, South Carolina and Florida sang "I Will Overcome" in the late 19th Century. One source states "I Will Be Alright" originated outside Charleston on Johns Island, South Carolina, with the same melody as today's "We Shall Overcome".

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Roberta Martin wrote another version ("I'll Be Like Him"), the last 12 bars of which are part of the current version of "We Shall Overcome."

Pete Seeger, who had the greatest hand in fashioning the song, also thinks it originated from the 19th century hymn, "I'll Be All Right" with an additional lyrical debt to Rev. Charles Tindley's 1903 "I'll Overcome Some Day"
In 1946, at the Highlander Folk School in Tennessee, Zilphia Horton, one of the people who ran that storied institution for the study of radical strategies, heard an adaptation of Tindley's song by members of a tobacco workers union in Charleston, South Carolina. A worker named Lucille Simmons had changed the words to fit their struggle--most importantly, substituting "We" for "I."
However, a letter printed on the front page of the February 1909, United Mine Workers Journal states that, "Last year at a strike, we opened every meeting with a prayer, and singing that good old song "WE Will Overcome". The lyrics and music were not printed, so we don't know for sure if this is the song we are exploring in this playlist, but the mention is significant, since this is the first mention of the song's being sung in a secular context and mixed race setting. It is also (if the quotation is accurate) the first instance of the use of the first person plural pronoun "WE" of a movement song instead of the singular "I" usual in the gospel and spiritual tradition.
Pete Seeger also mentiones it in the interview BELOW.


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Zilphia Horton on the Picket Line Chattanooga, TN, 1940s.


Pete Seeger talks about the history of "We Shall Overcome" in 2006




The song was published in September 1948 as “We Will Overcome” in the People’s Songs Bulletin Vol 3 # 8 (a publication of People’s Songs, an organization of which Pete Seeger was the director and guiding spirit). It appeared in the bulletin as a contribution of and with an introduction by Zilphia Horton, then music director of the Highlander Folk School of Monteagle, Tennessee, an adult education school that trained union organizers. It was her favorite song and she taught to countless others, including Pete Seeger, who included it in his repertoire, as did many other activist singers, such as Frank Hamilton and Joe Glazer, who recorded it in 1950.

The music may derive from a 1794 hymn called "O Sanctissima" or "Prayer of the Sicilian Mariners," though some parts of the song are more recent. The words "I'll overcome some day" first appeared in a hymn by C. Albert Tindley and Rev. A. R. Shockly in New Songs of the Gospel (1900); however, the tune was not the one we associate with the present-day song.

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You can browse this book on the next link
'http://www.archive.org/stream/newsongsofgospel00mile#page/n1/mode/2up



"O Sanctissima" or „O sanctissima, o piisima, dulcis Virgo Maria“ is part Christmas carol and part church motet, set to a melody called "The Sicilian Mariner’s Hymn to the Virgin" which may be Italian, English, or even Sicilian. No one knows, sometimes, where tunes originate, or when words become attached to a particular melody.
SICILIAN MARINERS is thought to be a tune sung by Sicilian seamen on board their ships when the sun set.

In 1966 James J. Fuld says:

The origin of the hymn "O Sanctissima" is uncertain, but its first known printing was, curiously, in the United States in May, 1794, in R. Shaw, The Gentleman's Amusement (Philadelphia, New York and Baltimore), p. 25, under the title "Prayer of the Sicilian Mariners".


It was published in London in 1795 with English text, a paraphrase of Psalm 19, God the Heav'ns Aloud Proclaim in the late Rev. James Merrick and the Rev. William Dechair Tattersall, Improved Psalmody, vol. I, p. 48, to "Sicilian Hymn".


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This lovely tune is such a mystery "O Sanctissima", with its original Latin text, the opening bars are familiarly known for their use in the song "We Shall Overcome."
All the early collectors implied an Italian origin, usually Sicilian, sometimes more specifically with the title Sicilian Mariner's Prayer. Yet there is no early Italian publication of the melody...


In 1788 the German philosopher, theologian, and poet Johann Gottfried von Herder (1744-1803) brought the melody to Germany after a trip to Italy. Originally a Sicilian fisherman's song, the melody was used for the Latin hymn "O Sanctissima".
In 1807, after the dead of von Herder, his heirs published "O Sanctissima" with a German translation ("O Du Heilige") in the collection Stimmen der Völker in Liedern

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You can read Johann Gottfried von Herders collection Stimmen der Völker in Liedern here:

http://archive.org/stream/stimmendervlke00herduoft#page/n5/mode/2up

It's on page 124:

http://archive.org/stream/stimmendervlke00herduoft#page/124/mode/2up





 In 1816 the tune was also used for the German Christmas Carol  ("O du fröhliche!")
The author of the original is the famous Weimar "orphan father" Johannes Daniel Falk (1768-1826).
Heinrich Holzschuher (1798-1847) from Wunsiedel wrote the latter three verses, which are sung today.
After Johannes Daniel Falk lost four of his seven children to typhoid fever, he founded das Rettungshaus für verwahrloste Kinder (lit. the rescue center for abandoned children) in Weimar. In 1816 he dedicated this song to the children of the orphanage. The Melody was taken from „O sanctissima, o piisima, dulcis Virgo Maria“ which is still sung in Italy and the Roman Catholic Church. Falk found this song in Johann Gottfried von Herders (1744-1803) collection Stimmen der Völker in Liedern.




The tune of "We Shall Overcome" has also been changed so that it also echoes the opening and closing melody of the powerfully resonant 19th century, "No More Auction Block For Me", also known from its refrain as, "Many Thousands Gone". This was number 35 ("Many Thousand Go") in Thomas Wentworth Higginson's collection of Negro Spirituals that appeared in the Atlantic Monthly of June, 1867, with a comment by Higginson reflecting on how such songs were composed (i.e., whether the work of a single author or through what used to be called "communal composition"):

http://digital.library.cornell.edu/cgi/t/text/pageviewer-idx?c=atla;cc=atla;rgn=full%20text;idno=atla0019-6;didno=atla0019-6;view=image;seq=698;node=atla0019-6%3A1;page=root;size=100

In fact "No More Auction Block" is equally indebted to "O Sanctissima" as "We Shall Overcome".

Listen to a version of "No More Auction Block For Me" by Paul Robeson.




But there's another influence: the chorus of "We Shall Overcome" has a close resemblance to "Caro Mio Ben" attributed to Neapolitan composer Giuseppe Giordani; this is also a late 18th century Italian song and was a staple of 19th century voice teachers.





The first recording of "We Will Overcome" was by Joe Glazer and the Elm City Four (1950)
In 1950 Joe Glazer made his first album, '8 New Songs for Labor,' for the C.I.0. Dept. of Education and Research.
It included "We Will Overcome", the previously unrecorded labor version of the old hymn. He had learned the song from Agnes Douty (at the same time as Pete Seeger had learned the song from Zilphia Horton).
And as Joe Glazer was singing "We WILL Overcome" to textile workers and other workers in 1947, Pete Seeger was singing "We SHALL Overcome" to audiences throughout the country. (Pete made a critical change in the lyric. Pete substituted the word SHALL for WILL. "I liked a more open sound," Pete explained. " 'We will' has alliteration to it but 'we shall' opens the mouth wider).
Pete tinkered a little with the music and added a couple of verses: "We'll walk hand in hand" and "The whole wide world around." Such adaptation was common with these "folk" songs. Somewhere along the line, "down in my heart" became "deep in my heart". In my singing I had dropped one of the original verses, "The Lord will see us through". My substitute verse was "We will build a new world," and that's the way I recorded it in 1950 in "8 New Songs For Labor". It was the first time a modern version of the song had been recorded.
(from Joe Glazer's autobiography "Labor's Troubadour")

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During a Southern C.I.0. drive, Joe Glazer taught the song to country singer  Texas Bill Strength , who cut his own version in 1950 on a custom pressing (SEE PIC BELOW), that later was picked up by 4-Star Records.
(reissued on 4-Star 45-1499 in July 1950 and on X-36 in January 1952)

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The song made its first recorded appearance as "We SHALL Overcome" (rather than "We WILL Overcome") in 1952 on a disc recorded by the Jewish Young Folk-Singers with Laura Duncan (soloist) (conducted by Robert De Cormier, co-produced by Ernie Lieberman and Irwin Silber on Hootenany Records (Hoot 104-A)

Here's the A-side of that disc

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It was rereleased in 1963 on Folkways album "Sing Out! Hootenanny" (Folkways FN 2513) (PIC BELOW), where it is identified as a Negro Spiritual.

http://www.folkways.si.edu/pete-seeger/sing-out-hootenanny-and-the-hooteneers/american-folk-struggle-protest/music/album/smithsonian

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In 1952 Pete Seeger taught it to Frank Hamilton and Guy Carawan in California. Zilphia Horton died in '56. In '59 Guy Carawan came to work at Highlander as a songleader. In 1960 he organized an "all-South" workshop for some 70 young people to talk and explore "singing in the movement". They latched on to the song immediately, but during the next year, as it moved into the deep South, it took on a more pronounced rhythm [...]. Three weeks later these young people and Guy introduced the song to the founding convention of SNCC (Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee) at Raleigh, N.C. A few months later across the entire South, it was not "a" song. It was "the" song.
Listen to a sample of a version by Guy Carawan recorded in 1960 at Newport.

http://www.folkways.si.edu/folk-music-of-the-newport-folk-festival-vol-2/american-folk/album/smithsonian

And here's another version compiled by Guy Carawan in  1960

http://www.folkways.si.edu/the-nashville-sit-in-story-songs-and-scenes-of-nashville-lunch-counter-desegregation-by-the-sit-in-participants/african-american-spoken-american-history-documentary-struggle-protest/album/smithsonian



Another version was also derived from "I'll Overcome Some Day".

(c) Angelic Gospel Singers 1955 (as "I'll Be Alright")
This lovely gospel version of "I'll (We Will) Overcome" was Buddy Holly's favourite, in fact after his death in 1959 an old well worn 45 of "I'll be alright" was found among his possions. He even based one of his compositions on this gospel; "True Love Ways".

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Listen here: note that the second verse exactly follows the lyrics of the refrain of  CA Tindley's gospel "I'll Overcome Some Day"




In 1961 Reverend Gary Davis also recorded this version, with some new words.

Reverend Gary Davis
Producer– Kenneth S. Goldstein
Recorded By– Rudy Van Gelder
Vocals, Guitar, Written-By– Reverend Gary Davis
Recorded in New York on August 10th, 1961.

http://www.discogs.com/Reverend-Gary-Davis-A-Little-More-Faith/release/2018937

Listen here:




On May 7, 1962 Pete Seeger, the man who was a key-person in the birth of "We Shall Overcome", finally recorded his own live-version at the Bitter End Cafe in New York.
It was released on the album: "The Bitter and the Sweet" (Columbia CS 8716).

http://www.discogs.com/Pete-Seeger-The-Bitter-And-The-Sweet/release/4071610




The roots of "We Shall Overcome" as a vehicle for social change can be traced to Tennessee in 1957, when the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. heard "We Shall Overcome" for the first time at the Highlander Folk School in Tennessee — performed by Dutchess Junction resident Pete Seeger.
The school was active in the labor and civil rights movements and welcomed Seeger, Rosa Parks and King for its 25th anniversary in 1957, a year after the Montgomery bus boycott ended with the desegregation of that Alabama city's bus system.

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From left, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., Pete Seeger, Charis Horton, Rosa Parks and the Rev. Ralph Abernathy at Highlander in 1957.

The first occasion on which Martin Luther King was recorded with a speech based on "We Shall Overcome" was recorded in 1962 on the next album.
Private pressing by: PICA (The Public Information Communications Association)
Rev. King's electrifying speech, of the Civil Rights Rally which was addressed at "The Zion Hill Baptist Church" in Los Angeles, California. June 17, 1962.
It contains the full speech; including the actual voice introduction by Bob Decoy, prior to the "We Shall Overcome" sermon given by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Some tracks have accompanied Gospel music but are uncredited on this recording.

http://www.discogs.com/Dr-Martin-Luther-King-Jr-Martin-Luther-King-At-Zion-Hill/release/2555015

A second pressing of this recording exist: shortly after King's assassination in 1968, the LP reappeared with the same catalog number, but this time on the Dooto label (Dooto # 831). But everything else is the same at the exeption of the label.

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 DOOTO; is actually "Dootsie Williams". An American bandleader, producer, musician and owner of "Dootone Records".

Unfortunately, however, this pioneering 1962 release was actually an unauthorised recording.
Read all about that here:
WE SHALL OVERCOME - MARTIN LUTHER KING 1962 at Zion Hill


The climax of the modern civil rights movement occurred in Birmingham. The city's violent response to the spring 1963 demonstrations against white supremacy forced the federal government to intervene on behalf of race reform. City Commissioner T. Eugene "Bull" Connor's use of police dogs and fire hoses against nonviolent black activists, led by Fred L. Shuttlesworth and Martin Luther King, Jr., enraged the nation.
On Good Friday, April 12, King is arrested with Ralph Abernathy by "Bull" Connor for demonstrating without a permit.

During the week of November 9, a live version of "We Shall Overcome", that Joan Baez recorded in May 1963 at Miles College in Birmingham managed to make the Hot 100 at No. 90. And that was it--even in the midst of a huge folk revival.
The most powerful and important political song of the 20th Century made the Billboard chart for precisely one week in the fall of 1963, yet it was heard virtually every day for years on radio and television, and its chorus and melody were known to all.

http://www.45cat.com/record/vrs35023

Listen here:




Pete Seeger's best recording of this song is from the June 8, 1963 Carnegie Hall Concert, where he performed it with the SNCC Freedom Singers, led by the now-legendary Bernie Johnson Reagon.
Seeger makes oblique reference to the "events" in Birmingham, Alabama. He explains that he visited the area, one front in the civil rights movement, a few weeks before. As he shares a brief set of the songs he heard there, more than a few in the crowd sing along.
When Seeger begins "We Shall Overcome," he urges his listeners to "go and help those people down in Birmingham and Mississippi . . . and maybe we'll see this song come true." And then he sings in that unshakable way of his. Pretty soon his believing becomes contagious, spreading possibility. And look where that eventually led: A reprehensible chapter in American history came to an end.

http://www.discogs.com/Pete-Seeger-We-Shall-Overcome/release/2846883





In 1963 the Freedom Singers recorded a live version at the Newport Folk Festival (July 26-28, 1963).
http://www.discogs.com/Various-The-Newport-Folk-Festival-1963-The-Evening-Concerts-Vol-1/release/2973798

A few monts later, the Freedom Singers recorded a semi-live studio version for the Mercury-label.

http://www.jazzdisco.org/mercury-records/discography-1963/#631007

http://www.discogs.com/Freedom-Singers-We-Shall-Overcome/release/3085348



The August 1963 March on Washington attracted an estimated 250,000 people for a peaceful demonstration to promote Civil Rights and economic equality for African Americans. Participants walked down Constitution and Independence avenues, then — 100 years after the Emancipation Proclamation was signed — gathered before the Lincoln Monument for speeches, songs, and prayer. Televised live to an audience of millions, the march provided dramatic moments, most memorably the Rev Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" speech.
The 22-year old folksinger Joan Baez, led the crowd in singing "We Shall Overcome" at the Lincoln Memorial during A. Philip Randolph's March on Washington.
Joan's performance was recorded on the next album:
Liner notes are by REV. MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. Label reads: "The Council For United Civil Rights Leadership Presents WE SHALL OVERCOME, The March on Washington--August 28, 1963"! This is a LIVE RECORDING of the important speeches and songs that were heard that day in Washington, DC. This was a day that changed America forever. This day energized and focused the Civil Rights movement and it blossomed across the country from that day forward. This was the day of the now very famous "I Have a Dream" speech by REV. MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. And, it is included on the album below in its entirety!

http://www.discogs.com/Various-We-Shall-Overcome-The-March-On-Washington-August-28th-1963/master/497171

The album ABOVE was the first commercial appearance of this material. The Council of United Civil Rights Leadership was a small students label. They handed the recordings over to Sis Cunningham, one of the founders of Broadside, who then produced the wider circulation album below.

http://www.folkways.si.edu/we-shall-overcome-documentary-of-the-march-on-washington/african-american-spoken-american-history-documentary-struggle-protest/album/smithsonian

That important day in Washington was also filmed:
Joan Baez sings "We Shall Overcome" at about 12 min and 53 sec in the next VIDEO.
Martin Luther Kings "I Have A Dream" speech is at 25 min and 20 sec.




Here's a close-up of Joan Baez singing "We Shall Overcome" in Washington.
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After Joan Baez led a mass singalong of "We Shall Overcome" at the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom (later referred to simply as the “Great March on Washington”), and her recording of it promptly began climbing the charts, Motown took note. They quickly had one Liz Lands record her own version, a tie-in with an LP of other political material related to the Great March, including contributions from A. Phillip Randolph, Walter Reuther, Roy Wilkins, Whitney Young and – most significantly, taking up most of the second side of the album – Dr Martin Luther King Jr., who delivered a version of his “I Have A Dream” speech (recorded in Detroit in June, several months before the March, rather than being a live recording from the day).
Liz Lands version was also planned as Motown's 340th single side
"We Shall Overcome"- Liz Lands
Scheduled for a 45 rpm release on Divinity 99008 (A),
September 1963 (but the release was canceled at the time)
"We Shall Overcome" b/w "Trouble In This Land"
(“Written by George Fowler and Clarence Paul“)

The 45 release was canceled at the time. (maybe they were afraid to interfere with politics and possibly losing money).

Still Liz Lands version WAS released in 1963 on the next album:

http://www.discogs.com/Various-The-Great-March-On-Washington/master/410983

And in 1968 the 45 of Liz Lands "We Shall Overcome" was finally released on the Gordy-label:

http://www.discogs.com/Rev-Martin-Luther-King-Jr-Liz-Lands-And-Voices-Of-Salvation-I-Have-A-Dream-We-Shall-Overcome/release/1985740

Listen here:





Mahalia Jackson also recorded "We Shall Overcome" in Los Angeles, Tuesday 25 September 1963 with Orchestra conducted by Marty Paich.

http://i2.ebayimg.com/06/i/000/de/58/14d5_1.JPG



The Brothers Four recorded a version in 1964 on the next album (You can listen to a sample)

http://www.akh.se/brothers4/cs9013.htm


And the brothers of the Brothers Four: The Limeliters recorded a version in the same year on the next album (You can listen to a sample)
http://www.akh.se/limeliters/lsp2889.htm



And there were also some reggae-versions:

Laurel Aitken 1966

http://www.discogs.com/Laurel-Aitken-We-Shall-Overcome-You-Left-Me-Standing/release/1499084


The Maytals 1968

http://maytals.net/7in80.html



Prince Buster 1968

http://www.discogs.com/Prince-Buster-All-Stars-We-Shall-Overcome-Keep-The-Faith/release/1495689






On March 31st, 1968, just four days before his death, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. gave the last version of his famous "We Shall Overcome" speech.



Here's the full text of that speech:

http://504ever.wordpress.com/2011/10/01/dr-martin-luther-kings-words-resonate-once-again-full-text-of-we-shall-overcome-speech-march-31-1968/




Joan Baez also performed "We Shall Overcome" in 1969 at the famous Woodstock-Festival
Baez began her set at 1:00 AM on Saturday, August 16 and closed Day One with "We Shall Overcome".

Here's the VIDEO of her Woodstock-performance.




Louis Armstrong's 1970 version, recorded 1 year before he died, has Louis on vocals. He doesn't play a single note on the trumpet, he leaves the honours to Thad Jones, Jimmy Owens, Ernie Royal and Marvin Stamm.

http://i2.ebayimg.com/01/i/000/d4/ca/8286_1.JPG





The following version was recorded at a reunion concert of the SNCC Freedom Singers in Washington DC in 1988 and was part of the soundtrack for the film on the history of the song. "We Shall Overcome" produced by Jim Brown and Ginger Productions won an Emmy in 1989 for the best news documentary.





During the 1993 Voodo Lounge sessions Keith Richards recorded a version of "We Shall Overcome"

- We Shall Overcome (When I Wage a Crown) (4:55): Keith Richards is on vocal and piano. He is sorting it out as he goes. Ice clinking alert at 1:31 and after the song at 4:57.
It was released in 1994 on Disc 4 of the Bootleg CD "Voodo Stew".
This song was later officially released on the 1996 record "Wingless Angels" with Richards and friends.

http://www.discogs.com/Wingless-Angels-Wingless-Angels/master/305920

Listen here:




Bruce Springsteen recorded Pete Seeger's arrangement of this old folk traditional song with a group of non-E Street Band musicians at his Thrill Hill home studio in Colts Neck, NJ, on 02 Nov 1997, during the first of the 3 "Seeger Sessions". The song was recorded especially for the Mar 1998 tribute album, Where Have All The Flowers Gone: The Songs Of Pete Seeger (Appleseed Recordings, catalogue # APPLESEED 1024).

http://www.discogs.com/Various-Where-Have-All-The-Flowers-Gone-The-Songs-Of-Pete-Seeger/release/648264

The song is also included on Bruce's 2006 cover album, "We Shall Overcome - The Seeger Sessions".
It is the same Nov 1997 recording, but the mix is slightly different.
The Seeger Sessions consist of three recording sessions (a 2-days session on 01 and 02 Nov 1997, a 1-day session in Dec 2005, and a 1-day session in Jan 2006), during which all the album's songs were cut live in the living room of Bruce's New Jersey farmhouse. The songs were not rehearsed and all arrangements were conducted as Bruce and the band played.

http://www.discogs.com/Bruce-Springsteen-We-Shall-Overcome-The-Seeger-Sessions/release/1290406

Here's a Youtube of Bruce singing "We Shall Overcome":




Obama at Ebenezer
This is the conclusion of Obama's speech at the church on Martin Luther King on King's Birthday in 2008, when the congregation sings "We Shall Overcome."





From Pete Seeger's 90th Birthday Concert (Clearwater Concert), Madison Square Garden, 5/3/2009. Featuring: Emmylou Harris, Joan Baez, Bruce Cockburn, Guy Davis, Toshi Reagon, Bernice Johnson Reagon, Tao Rodriguez-Seeger, Billy Bragg, Keller Williams, Ani DiFranco, Larry Long, Scarlett Lee Moore, Ruby Dee, Preservation Hall Jazz Band, New York City Labor Choir.





Roger Waters recorded a version to support the people of Gaza.
Here is what he says about the Gaza-issue:
"Over the new year 2009-2010, an international group of 1500 men and women from 42 nations went to Egypt to join a Freedom March to Gaza. They did this to protest the current blockade of Gaza. To protest the fact that the people of Gaza live in a virtual prison. To protest the fact that a year after the terror attack by Israeli armed forces destroyed most of their homes, hospitals, schools, and other public buildings, they have no possibility to rebuild because their borders are closed. The would be Freedom Marchers wanted to peacefully draw attention to the predicament of the Palestinian population of Gaza. The Egyptian government, (funded to the tune of $2.1 billion a year, by us, the US tax payers), would not allow the marchers to approach Gaza. How lame is that? And how predictable! I live in the USA and during this time Dec 25th 2009-Jan3rd 2010 I saw no reference to Gaza or the Freedom March or the multi national protesters gathered there. Anyway I was moved, in the circumstances, to record a new version of " We shall overcome". It seems appropriate.






In India, it is known as “Hum Honge Kaamyaab,” a song most every school kid knows by heart.




In the next scene from the movie "My Name Is Khan" the 2 songs "We Shall Overcome" and "Hum Honge Kaamyaab" are mixed.






The next PDF-File has a lot of information on the history of "We Shall Overcome" (page 66)

http://freedom-songs.org/Spirituals-of-the-African-American-Freedom-Struggle-Mueller.pdf



More recent research suggests that a more likely musical source was a gospel hymn entitled “If My Jesus Wills” which was composed during the early 1930s, published in 1942 and copyrighted in 1954 by an African American Baptist choir director named Louise Shropshire who was a close friend of songwriter Rev. Thomas Dorsey, and civil rights activists Dr. Martin Luther King and Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth. Because of the lyrical and structural similarities Seeger now thinks that Horton probably taught him a secular version (that included her own verse changes as well) of Shropshire’s song.
Personally I think Louise Shropshire's version is merely another link in the chain of a song that evolved from Charles Albert Tindley's "I'll Overcome Some Day" to the wellknown version of "We Shall Overcome" and it's surely not the MUSICAL source.

Well judge for yourself after seeing the 2 Youtubes below.